Performance Testing Made Simpler with iCDM

Bala Chandrasekaran

Principal Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC
Bala Chandrasekaran is a Principal Product Marketing Manager at Dell EMC and delivers marketing efforts for All Flash primary storage. He brings to Dell EMC his 12 years of IT industry experience across various customer facing roles including pre-sales, consulting and technical services. He is a certified professional in IBM DB2 and Oracle Databases. He has an undergraduate engineering degree from Anna University, India and MBA from Foster School of Business of University of Washington.

Latest posts by Bala Chandrasekaran (see all)

At the recently concluded Oracle Open World show in San Francisco, many mutual customers of Oracle and Dell EMC shared how their organizations benefited from the consistent low IO response time from Dell EMC All Flash storage.

In one of the conversations, a DBA mentioned that having production databases on all flash storage while the test databases are on a slower disk-based storage system posed interesting challenges in database performance tuning and diagnosis. He went on to share how ‘Top Wait events’ on the Oracle AWR reports and the access paths suggested by the SQL Explain reports were different across production and test databases. Since the test databases were hosted on a slower disk-based storage system, he said, the application wait events observed in production were hidden behind the “User IO” class wait events in the test.

Traditionally, IT teams’ approach for performance testing has been to manage a production-like infrastructure with complete production data. When time is of the essence, database specialists would migrate the schema statistics from production and use optimizer hints on SQLs to influence database optimizer in order to pick a particular access path.

Although the proactive performance testing ahead of going live helps to reduce risk, these approaches have been complex, time consuming, and cost prohibitive. While the benefits of all flash storage are obvious for production environments, justifying flash-based media for test databases has been difficult.

I’m happy to share that, now, database and application teams can unlock Rapid Tuning with integrated Copy Data Management (iCDM) available on Dell EMC All Flash Storage. Be it for either diagnosing a performance problem in production or evaluating the performance in the application development lifecycle, it is very easy to make a high-performance application-consistent copy of a database on Dell EMC All Flash Storage in a space-efficient way.


Consolidation of performance-sensitive non-production databases as virtual copies on Dell EMC all flash arrays automatically simplifies database operational activities such as upgrade and patching required ahead of testing. Since the test database copies also inherit the enterprise-class data services such as encryption and compression, the I/O performance would be completely comparable to that in production. (more…)

Modernized Data Protection for the SDDC

Deanna Hoover

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC
Deanna Hoover started her IT career over 30 years ago with a focus on software and hardware engineering. She has had the opportunity to work in a variety of different industries and has built a broad skillset ranging from writing machine code in a factory, migration of mainframe to client server, and storage architecture as well as systems and database administration. In August of 2004 Deanna made the move to EMC as a backup, recovery and archive presales SE. Since that time she has managed a Professional Services team and as of current is in marketing for Dell EMC with a focus on virtualization backup and recovery software. In her spare time Deanna enjoys the outdoors and participates in triathlons.


VMworld 2016 was a huge success and set a new record of 23,000 attendees in the US alone. The theme was   ‘be_tomorrow’ with focus on the technology, trends and people who are shaping the future of the digital business.

I asked several attendees how data protection of their environments fits into the be_tomorrow theme.

My findings:  Software Defined Data Center  (SDDC) is in the forefront of planning for modernizing data centers.  Data protection is an integral part of the SDDC strategy. Key requirements I heard from VMworld attendees:

  • Automation
  • Self-service capabilities
  • Multiple tiers of data protection

The SDDC enables customers to scale by rapidly provisioning applications across clouds and devices.  A few benefits of the SDDC include improved compliance, faster time to market, boost capacity and lower costs.

The evolution of the SDDC reminds me of when Henry Ford installed the first moving assembly line in 1910. His innovation reduced the time it took to build a car from 16 hours to 8 hours. Many years later, a digital factory with robots was created.  The digital factory reduces human error and repetitive processes. Technology within the factory continues to progress; however, technology failures increase the cost to do business.

What is the relationship between the assembly line and the SDDC?   The assembly line started the revolution of automation while reducing manual labor. The SDDC is the evolution of an agile digital business in which all the infrastructure is virtualized and delivered “as-a-service. Both require protection against failures and outages.

Outages within a SDDC have the potential of causing data loss – increasing your cost to do business. While very important, data protection is not always included during the provisioning process. (more…)

Not Using a Full Backup for Your Big Data? You Should Be

Alyanna Ilyadis

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC
Alyanna is a Product Marketing Manager at Dell EMC working in data protection. She graduated from Bryant University in 2015 and has been working at Dell EMC since then. Outside of work, she enjoys illustrating and putting too much time into video games.

Your business relies on making sure all its important information is kept safe and easily recoverable if something goes wrong. When we start talking about mission critical applications, most people can’t imagine themselves not keeping that data safe. As Big Data starts to become (and has become) mission critical, there begins a growing need to protect it.


Businesses used to understand data as being structured or neatly organized in databases found within the enterprise.  But then, an emergence of new data started to spread, data is now being gathered from many diverse sources. Web logs, ecommerce transactions and demographic information left behind by customer interactions with a company became a useful source of data for corporations. This rapid growth of new data sources that is characterized by high volumes of growth, generated at high velocities, and include both these structured and unstructured data sources could be analyzed and used to better the business. For instance, Chrysler uses data gathered from their manufacturing floor, which is then used to help boost operational efficiency. All fortune 100 companies are using Big Data analytics, and with rapid technology adoption, projects are maturing faster than ever. This Big Data holds great value to businesses by allowing them to better understand their customers and gain a competitive edge, but it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage and protect. (more…)

Are You Ready for Dell EMC World?

Jamie Doherty

Social Media Engagement Manager, Dell EMC
Jamie brings over 20 years of experience in both traditional and digital marketing and has worked for companies like Direct to Retail Advertising, The Robb Report Magazine and She joined EMC over three years ago to manage the Advanced Software Division’s social media strategy, and since then has taken on the challenge of managing the social media strategy for Dell EMC's Core Technologies Division. Jamie is also a Beachbody Coach helping to inspire others to live a healthier and more active lifestyle. When she is not Tweeting on behalf of EMC or working out to Beachbody, you can find her at a live music venue watching her favorite artist or planning her next theme party.

This year is a very special Dell EMC World as it is the first event we are hosting as a combined company. Three amazing days will be spent in Austin, one of this writers favorite cities, listening to industry leaders talk about the future of technology, the future of Dell EMC and of course some amazing music.

Our division, Core Technologies as known in the inner walls of the company, is especially excited about this year’s event. Just last week we had four major announcements within our product lines. If you are one of the lucky ones attending Dell EMC World you will be able to take a deep dive first hand from our experts on site. Just in case you did miss the announcements, you can view them right here:

As an attendee of Dell EMC World we do want to give you every opportunity to learn how to modernize your data center with all-flash storage and make sure your data is protected everywhere, no matter where it lives. The first place you can meet face-to-face with our experts and get live demos is in the booth. Be sure to visit our experts in the Data Center Booth B17 or the Big Data Booth F1.
The next option is to attend a session. Check out this schedule of sessions being hosted by the Core Technologies Team :
The team will also be hosting right in the booths a series of theater presentations led by our experts. If you get the opportunity I would highly recommend checking them out. Here is the schedule:


Lastly once you’ve learned all about the amazing features of the Dell EMC Core Technologies products, I bet you’ll want to get your hands on them. At Dell EMC World you can on Wednesday October 19 from 11am to 5pm and on Thursday October 20 from 8am to 10:30am. Check out all the great products you can get your hands on:

For those of you who are not going to the event we do want to make sure you can experience Dell EMC World virtually. Pull out your smartphone or jump on your Dell 2-in-1, open your Twitter app, and follow @DellEMCProtect, @DellEMCStorage, and @DellEMCXtremIO. All of the activities and additional announcements (Spoiler Alert! Yes, there’s more coming) will be reported real time on these Twitter handles so be sure to follow along and get social with us!

Whether you are live at Dell EMC World or following along on Twitter – the Dell EMC Core Technologies Team looks forward to engaging with you!

Winning the Olympic Gold and Modernizing the Data Center shouldn’t be a Flash in the Pan

Sebastian Yiang

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC Core Technologies, Asia Pacific and Japan
I started out in the IT industry almost 20 years ago as a systems analyst in a large telco within its Internet Service Provider BU to drive product and business development of consumer and enterprise Internet services. I then had the opportunity to do business development and product marketing for connected consumer electronics, web hosting and data center services, and storage solutions before I joined EMC. My current role at Dell EMC is product marketing for Data Protection and Availability Division for Asia Pacific and Japan region. I am based in sunny Singapore and enjoy traveling with my family.

all-flash-olympicsIt was August 12th. The 100m butterfly finals at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games glued a nation of 5 million to their television sets as their national swimmer Joseph Schooling competed with the Games’ most medaled and legendary Michael Phelps. Smashing the Olympic, Asian and national records, Schooling became the world’s fastest butterfly specialist and brought home Singapore’s first-ever Olympic Gold medal. Schooling has taught us many valuable lessons. His achievement shows us that we can all achieve our dreams if we set our goals, take actions and stick to the game plan, despite facing challenges and failures along the journey.

What lessons can enterprise IT learn from this success story?



Review and Update Your Business and IT Goals
At the age of 14, Schooling met his idol Michael Phelps in Singapore back in 2008 when the United States Olympic swim team stopped over for a training camp before the Beijing Olympics. Eight years later, he beat his idol with an Olympic record of 50.39 seconds in the 100m butterfly event. Schooling revealed in a local press interview that Phelps helped to inspire him to achieve Olympic glory. His goal is nothing less than a gold medal. With his Olympic dream in mind, Schooling gave himself a higher goal after achieving major milestones.

Many IT professionals have personal goals in their career. But how many know their organization’s business and IT goals? For enterprise IT to achieve success in positively impacting the organization’s business and growth, there must be a strategic goal and plan that motivates every IT personnel. Otherwise, disengaged and unmotivated staff affects IT productivity and staff morale, and even derails your goals.

Most IT organizations have strategic goals to optimize or modernize their data centers through the deployment of virtualization, cloud, software-defined and open platform technologies. With flash drives becoming more affordable over the last few years, compression technologies and business requirement for always-on mission-critical applications, many IT organizations are now looking to modernize their data centers with all flash storage arrays and relegating traditional disk to bulk and archive storage requirements.

If you have not considered an all-flash storage strategy for your data center, this IDC infobrief on global flash technology adoption dated Feb 2016 may change your mind. It concludes that “flash is unlocking innovation and enabling business transformation”. (more…)




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