Global Sales Contact List

Contact   A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Education IT and the Cloud: 5 Parachutes to Pack as You Jump Into the Cloud

Lori Witzel

Lori Witzel

Product Marketing Manager, Spanning by EMC
Lori Witzel is a Salesforce MVP, has worked with and for SaaS companies since 2005, and has been sharing info with, listening to, and learning from tech users ever since. She is currently PMM for Spanning Backup for Salesforce, as well as PMM for Spanning Backup for Google Apps. Prior to Spanning Backup, Lori worked for various early-stage Cloud start-ups, mid-sized middleware providers, and ed tech firms, and she’s always eager to learn more. Lori's profile on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/loriwitzel

A growing number of K-12 and Higher Ed IT teams are adopting cloud and SaaS applications like Google Apps for Education or Microsoft Office 365 Education. The reasons are as varied as the school, district, or university – but in every case, these adoptions represent significant change within the organization.
education-cloud

Some of the reasons that education IT is moving to the cloud are that the cloud:

  • Increases collaboration. Through cloud computing’s ease of cross-classroom, cross-department, and cross-institution collaboration, instructors, staff, and students can work together in new and creative ways. Since collaboration is a significant component of Common Core, there’s increased interest among K-12 districts in exploring ways to use SaaS and cloud.
  • Supports innovation. By using cloud-based applications and systems, it’s easier for Higher Ed to open their technology infrastructure to business and industry research partners, fostering collaboration towards innovation and research.
  • Helps resource management scale. Cloud computing can help K-12 and Higher Ed manage ever-growing resource demands. Cloud and SaaS vendors manage most aspects of the required infrastructure, an infrastructure that used to need management on-premises by the IT team. Those vendors’ infrastructure is at a scale that produces efficiencies for their customers, whose resources can be freed up for new IT projects.
  • Reduces on-premises infrastructure risk. Cloud vendors are multiply redundant, security-hardened, FERPA-ready, and provide robust security infrastructures that reduce the risk and the impact of hardware and infrastructure failure. On-premises systems can be similarly hardened, but require resources for infrastructure and risk management.

In short, the cloud offers education IT and the institutions they support powerful benefits. Whether your school is evaluating a move to the cloud, or has decided to move, there are five best practices every K-12 or Higher Ed IT team should be prepared to implement. (more…)

Now that Data Centers are Bursting at the Seams is it Time to Modernize?

Guy Churchward

Guy Churchward

President, Core Technologies Division
Guy Churchward is President of Core Technologies at EMC Corporation. He is responsible for a division that is redefining storage, through a comprehensive portfolio of core storage solutions encompassing the award-winning VMAX, VNX, VNXe, XtremIO, VPLEX, and Data Domain technologies and a cutting-edge software portfolio that delivers simplified storage systems management, continuous availability, replication, backup, and archive solutions. Churchward has more than 27 years of experience in the IT industry, with broad international experience that spans executive management, engineering, sales, marketing and business development capacities. He joined EMC in May 2012, when he served as Senior Vice President of Engineering for the Backup & Recovery Systems Division, before becoming Division President in October 2012. He was appointed to lead the Core Technologies Division in October 2014. Prior to joining EMC, Churchward was President and CEO of LogLogic, an enterprise log and security intelligence platform company. He has also served as Vice President and General Manager of the Data Protection Group at NetApp, where he was responsible for product strategy and development of the company's portfolio of disk-to-disk and disaster recovery products, as well as Vice President and General Manager of BEA's WebLogic Products Group. In addition, he has held senior management positions at Sun Microsystems (formerly Tarantella Inc.), The Santa Cruz Operation (formerly IXI), Accenture (formerly Binder Hamlyn) and Olivetti. Churchward holds an Executive MBA from Stanford Business School and studied computer science at Cambridge Tutors College, England.

When you live in an older house, where the layout doesn’t really work for the way you live your life and there aren’t enough closets to satiate your wife’s shoe fetish, maybe it’s time to modernize! But do you knock the whole house down and start again? Maybe it’s tempting but, what about the investment that you’ve already made in your home? The bathroom you had refitted last year or the wiring you had redone? And where are you going to live during the whole inevitably elongated process?

home-remodel

It’s similar when you want to modernize your IT infrastructure: you have money sunk into your existing technology – probably still amortized for a year or two into the future – and you don’t want to face the disruption of completely starting again. We call this investment hangover ‘tech debt’.

For many companies, this debt includes a strategy for data storage that takes advantage of a shrinking per-gig cost of storage that enables them to keep everything. And that data is probably stored primarily on spinning disk with some high-availability workloads on flash in their primary data center. The old way of doing things was to see volumes of data growing and address that on a point basis with more spinning disk.

But, just like the house we mentioned earlier, data centers are bursting at the seams and it’s now time to modernize – but how?

Read the full blog here to learn how to get started!

Road to Efficiency, Part 2

Vladimir Mandic

Vladimir Mandic

Chief Technology Officer & Distinguished Engineer Data Protection Cloud, Core Technologies Division, EMC2
Vladimir has been driving technical innovation and change within EMC for the past 10 years, first in the area of data protection software and, currently, in cloud technologies. Prior to that, he’s had rich industry experience as a solution integrator and in the service provider space. When not working on technology innovation, he may be difficult to locate due to his passion for world travel.
Vladimir Mandic

Latest posts by Vladimir Mandic (see all)

As business look at cloud adoption, the question is, “What is the cloud good for?” Yes, the cloud can be efficient and elastic, but what would be its real use in complex environments?

A different way of looking at the road to the cloud is by considering where your data—both primary and secondary copies—resides.
efficiency2-1Cloud as 3rd copy
In a typical data center your primary file and application data would reside in on-premises storage arrays such as XtremIO, VMAX, VNX or Isilon. Second-level protection is offered via data protection solutions using secondary storage such as EMC Data Domain. As a last step, select data can be tiered to the cloud via products such as CloudBoost or CloudArray, to either private clouds built using ECS or public clouds. That means that data in the cloud is a 3rd tier of data. This is a good way to achieve efficiencies for specific use cases such as long-term retention, offsite copy of data, and data archiving while maintaining all primary processing within the data center.

Cloud as 2nd copy
A more direct way of using the cloud is by having data copied directly from primary storage to the cloud (that is, storage tiering) or protecting data directly to the cloud. This results in even higher efficiencies; however, this creates a much larger dependency on the cloud for operational recovery purposes as there is no second copy of data on premises.

Ideally, at this point we would look at direct-to-cloud tiering and protection with ability to maintain on-premises copies of active data for quick access.

Cloud as 1st copy
The last step in cloud adoption is where your primary data resides directly in the cloud, either with SaaS applications (such as Office 365, Salesforce, and Google Apps) or hosted applications running on cloud-based PaaS (such as developed using Pivotal’s Cloud Foundry platform) or IaaS (such as Amazon AWS or Microsoft Azure). In that case, the need for data protection still remains even if infrastructure resiliency responsibility has moved to the cloud solution provider. And to achieve efficiencies, data protection solution and resulting data copies also reside in the cloud itself. However, in that case you may need to export data back to on-premises either for safety, compliancy, or other reasons. (more…)

Stepping Up to the Plate for Mid-Tier Storage

It’s not uncommon to use baseball metaphors to describe business success and how they compete. And since it’s the start of the new baseball season – let’s do it.  Innovative ideas, talented people, courage to change, and lofty goals are a lot like what it takes to field a winning baseball team.  There’s a lot of similarity between a winning baseball team assembled for fans and building out innovative business solutions for customers. And as businesses swing for the “technology” fences, they also need to learn to handle the curveballs thrown at them like market shifts, technology changes, global economics, and customer trends.
sb10068701ab-001

Even with the love of the game in mind, mid-tier companies struggle with having the same needs for business agility and efficiency to address a growing set of application and virtualization needs as larger enterprise organizations – but with IT budgets that are just a fraction of their enterprise peers.

There’s a growing need for mid-tier IT organizations to reduce risk, be agile, and simplify and automate operations – and all while keeping costs down. Up to now, no vendor has batted a thousand on delivering all of this in a single solution – especially with storage.

These IT departments struggle with storage from a number of standpoints, including management complexity, inflexible deployment options, data growth, and a lack of affordable flash storage options. As resources become even more constrained, and IT budgets generally remaining flat, IT has had to handle servers, storage, networking, data protection, virtualization and more.  Gone are the days of having a dedicated admin focused only on storage. Let’s face it, in mid-tier businesses; IT personnel are being transformed into generalists forced into ‘playing’ many technology positions to stay competitively viable.

When IT decides to make a storage purchase, they need that storage to last.  The tools must be modern, easy to understand, easy to use, and leverage the latest technology that helps simplify and automate tasks.  At the same time, the systems they purchase must be affordable, deliver the best TCO throughout the life of the array and be flexible enough to be repurposed for a variety of different workloads. This is a lot to ask from a single mid-tier storage array, tasked with running important business applications. And the competitors have either struck out or taken a rain check on much of this. (more…)

Road to Efficiency, Part 1

Vladimir Mandic

Vladimir Mandic

Chief Technology Officer & Distinguished Engineer Data Protection Cloud, Core Technologies Division, EMC2
Vladimir has been driving technical innovation and change within EMC for the past 10 years, first in the area of data protection software and, currently, in cloud technologies. Prior to that, he’s had rich industry experience as a solution integrator and in the service provider space. When not working on technology innovation, he may be difficult to locate due to his passion for world travel.
Vladimir Mandic

Latest posts by Vladimir Mandic (see all)

In the new IT, there are so many buzzwords, especially around cloud services. Where does the cloud actually fit?
Clouds can be private or public, and they can serve traditional “Platform 2” applications as well as new “Platform 3” applications. So let’s look at cloud services from that perspective.
Road to Efficiency 1Of course, some things don’t change regardless of the quadrant of the matrix. We always need to:

  • Protect the data wherever it is
  • Simplify management across environments
  • Get more value out of the data

(more…)

SUBSCRIBE BELOW

Categories

Archives

Connect with us on Twitter

Click here for the Cloud Chats blog