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Backing Up Your Data Should Be a Routine, Not a Tradition

David Tye

Product Marketing Manager
As a recent graduate from Sacramento State University I am able to take what I have learned in school and apply it to the high tech industry and the problems companies are facing today. I am a California native, die hard Green Bay Packers fan, and an outdoor enthusiast.

Latest posts by David Tye (see all)

With the holiday season upon us, it’s time to break out the lights, decorations, gifts and, of course, good food. Thanksgiving is a time for all of us to give thanks and spend time with the ones we love. Like many families, my family partakes in a variety of holiday traditions. Every Turkey Day we bring out the “Giving Tree.” The Giving Tree contains blank leaves, which are filled out anonymously with phrases and sayings of what each of us is thankful for. After dinner, each leaf is pulled off the tree and read aloud. Family members then have to guess which leaf belongs to whom. I’ll give you a hint: any leaf that mentions the Green Bay Packers is probably mine.

People Talking Celebrating Thanksgiving Holiday Concept

The Giving Tree is a one-time occurrence that takes place on the night of Thanksgiving. Backing up your data, on the other hand, is something that needs to be routine. The most important information that resides on any endpoint is your data. Operating systems and applications can be reinstalled relatively easily; however, getting your original data back is not so easy. Backing up your data is paramount when it comes to data protection. According to the Global Data Protection Index, a third-party study that surveyed 2,200 IT decision makers across 18 countries, 30% of respondents had lost data in the last 12 months!

There are a variety of methods you can use to back up data. In the past, backing up data to an external hard drive or tape was standard operating procedure. In today’s IT landscape, businesses large and small are adopting more modern and automated approaches such as cloud backup. Backing up data has moved from a cumbersome manual process to a simple automated process in a relatively short amount of time. For example, Mozy by Dell lets you log in to an easy-to-use admin console and set backups to happen automatically on a weekly, daily or hourly cadence, depending on user needs. (more…)

Why Do I Need Endpoint Protection?

David Tye

Product Marketing Manager
As a recent graduate from Sacramento State University I am able to take what I have learned in school and apply it to the high tech industry and the problems companies are facing today. I am a California native, die hard Green Bay Packers fan, and an outdoor enthusiast.

Latest posts by David Tye (see all)

When I was a kid my parents would always ask, “David, why do you need an Xbox?” or “Why do you need this new game?” As a kid, it was sometimes hard to come up with a valid reason why I needed a new game or gaming device. Now that I have made my transition from a college student to full-time IT professional, I am faced with new questions. Specifically, “Why do I need endpoint protection?” The answer to this question isn’t as complicated as you might think.
video gamer

Backing up your endpoints is something that every business, small or large, should be doing. There is a plethora of reasons why we need to protect our endpoints. Like all humans, we make mistakes. User error, although a mistake, can still be detrimental to a business. Accidental deletion of data is something that happens far too often. As users of desktops and laptops we are also susceptible to hardware failure. Most of a user’s data resides on a single hard drive, thus a hard drive failure can result in a catastrophic loss of data.

User errors and hard drive failure are not the only threats to the data that reside on your endpoints. Cybercrime, such as ransomware, has been on the rise this year. According to the FBI, $209 million dollars were paid in ransoms in Q1 2016, putting ransomware on course to become a $1+ billion industry by the end of 2016. It’s important to note that just because you pay the ransom does not necessarily mean you are guaranteed to get your data back! A hospital in Wichita, Kansas, learned this the hard way. (more…)

Ransomware 101

David Tye

Product Marketing Manager
As a recent graduate from Sacramento State University I am able to take what I have learned in school and apply it to the high tech industry and the problems companies are facing today. I am a California native, die hard Green Bay Packers fan, and an outdoor enthusiast.

Latest posts by David Tye (see all)

Ransomware is a worldwide phenomenon that is affecting users all around the globe. According to a recent study published by McAfee Labs, ransomware growth increased by 58 percent for the second quarter of 2015. For all businesses, small or large, the question is not “Will I be a victim of ransomware?” Instead, the question everyone should be asking is “Will I be prepared when ransomware attacks?” That said, falling victim to a ransomware attack is not the end of the world if you have a proper backup policy in place.
ransomware

Ransomware first arrived on the scene in 2005. The first known ransomware strain was The Trojan.Gpcoder, which affected Windows operating systems.  Ransomware is comparable to humans in that it comes in all shapes, sizes, and colors. Ransomware attacks once used screen pop-ups that would notify users of the attack and the amount of money required to unlock a computer. Today’s ransomware attacks are more sophisticated than ever and use “unbreakable encryption.” That usually means if you do not have your data backed up you will not be seeing that data again (AKA you’re toast)—unless you pay the ransom. And paying the ransom does not guarantee that you will gain access to your data.

Ransomware can infiltrate and spread through your systems in a matter of minutes; all it takes is one wrong click. This type of malware typically enters a network through its weakest link, normally social media or an email with an infected link or attachment. Ransomware is an effective form of cybercrime because the attackers can instill both fear and panic in their victims. But there are other reasons as well: ransomware is easy to create and deploy. The good news is that we can all fight this sort of cybercrime with a thorough backup plan.

(more…)

What can SaaS do for you?

David Tye

Product Marketing Manager
As a recent graduate from Sacramento State University I am able to take what I have learned in school and apply it to the high tech industry and the problems companies are facing today. I am a California native, die hard Green Bay Packers fan, and an outdoor enthusiast.

Latest posts by David Tye (see all)

data protection for SaaSToday’s business owners face the constant challenge of reducing costs yet at the same time driving increases in revenue. One way a business can reduce capital expenditures is by utilizing SaaS applications. Not familiar with SaaS? Gartner defines software as a service (SaaS) “as software that is owned, delivered and managed remotely by one or more providers. The provider delivers software based on one set of common code and data definitions that is consumed in a one-to-many model by all contracted customers at anytime on a pay-for-use basis or as a subscription based on use metrics.”

You might be asking yourself, “What are a few examples of SaaS applications?” SaaS applications include but are not limited to, Google Apps, Twitter, and Salesforce. Because SaaS applications provide significant benefits, they are rapidly penetrating the IT market. Benefits include low cost, pay-as-you-go subscription model, and little to no maintenance for the business owner.

Cost savings is always top of mind for today’s business owners. SaaS applications can save businesses money on multiple fronts. The biggest cost savings come in the form of no additional capital expenditures. The SaaS provider supplies the appropriate software, storage and resources to get the customer up and running quickly. For example, when a business purchases a public cloud service to safeguard data on desktops and laptops, the software can be downloaded quickly, and in a relatively short time the business can be securely backing up important files.

The pay-as-you-go business model is simple yet efficient. Pay as you go gives your business the benefit of accurate budgeting practices as well as the ability to forecast costs as your business scales. Pay as you go also gives you the flexibility of not being tied down by lengthy contracts that can hinder your business operations.

An additional benefit of being a SaaS customer is that the service provider is responsible for making sure systems are up to date and that security is handled responsibly. This is a huge upside for the customer because, instead of worrying about security, the IT department can utilize its time and resources on business-critical priorities. Security is something that SaaS providers do not take lightly. For example, a SaaS backup service from EMC utilizes only world-class data centers, embracing the highest of security measures, including 24x7x365 onsite monitoring and security, temperature controls, backup power supplies, fire suppression systems, and biometric scanners.

The benefits of SaaS go far beyond what I’ve discussed in this post. SaaS applications provide numerous benefits across many different industries, making it one of the fastest growing technology sectors. If you’re not already taking advantage of SaaS applications, now is the time to be asking yourself, “What can SaaS do for me?”

El Nino and the Cloud

David Tye

Product Marketing Manager
As a recent graduate from Sacramento State University I am able to take what I have learned in school and apply it to the high tech industry and the problems companies are facing today. I am a California native, die hard Green Bay Packers fan, and an outdoor enthusiast.

Latest posts by David Tye (see all)

As a longtime resident of California I have seen the impact of the current drought first hand. There has been little to no snow in the Sierras, lake levels are low, and there’s been a change in my water supplier due to the lack of water. For the past few months there has been a lot of speculation about the chance of El Niño hitting California and hopefully alleviating the current drought conditions. As of this past week there is a 95 percent chance El Niño will arrive, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

El Niño occurs when tropical Pacific Ocean trade winds die out and ocean temperatures become warmer than normal. Although we desperately need water in California, El Niño will bring vast amounts of water to the state within a very short period of time, potentially causing floods and landslides in parts of Southern California. When the storm hits during the 2015-2016 winter, businesses located in the southern half of the United States and Southern California must be ready for disaster recovery. Heavy rains and strong winds can cause severe damage to structures, destroying the business-critical data inside.
El Nino (more…)

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