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Expanding the Horizon for Dell EMC Midrange Storage Customers

Guy Churchward

President, Core Technologies Division
Guy Churchward is President of Core Technologies at EMC Corporation. He is responsible for a division that is redefining storage, through a comprehensive portfolio of core storage solutions encompassing the award-winning VMAX, VNX, VNXe, XtremIO, VPLEX, and Data Domain technologies and a cutting-edge software portfolio that delivers simplified storage systems management, continuous availability, replication, backup, and archive solutions. Churchward has more than 27 years of experience in the IT industry, with broad international experience that spans executive management, engineering, sales, marketing and business development capacities. He joined EMC in May 2012, when he served as Senior Vice President of Engineering for the Backup & Recovery Systems Division, before becoming Division President in October 2012. He was appointed to lead the Core Technologies Division in October 2014. Prior to joining EMC, Churchward was President and CEO of LogLogic, an enterprise log and security intelligence platform company. He has also served as Vice President and General Manager of the Data Protection Group at NetApp, where he was responsible for product strategy and development of the company's portfolio of disk-to-disk and disaster recovery products, as well as Vice President and General Manager of BEA's WebLogic Products Group. In addition, he has held senior management positions at Sun Microsystems (formerly Tarantella Inc.), The Santa Cruz Operation (formerly IXI), Accenture (formerly Binder Hamlyn) and Olivetti. Churchward holds an Executive MBA from Stanford Business School and studied computer science at Cambridge Tutors College, England.

Here we are as Dell EMC, and we’re champing at the bit to show our customers, partners and the world what we’re made of as a combined business. We were already recognized as the leader in data storage pre-merger and together we’re going from strong to stronger, now number one across all combined mid-range markets in which we play. If you’re a customer or partner of either company this bodes well for you, as Dell EMC can now offer an even greater choice of world-class products from a single vendor, which has become the largest privately controlled IT company in the world.

Since we started this journey nearly a year ago, we’ve had a number of questions from customers about our plans to support the midrange storage portfolios that are coming together. Let me confirm that we are 100% committed to supporting both EMC Unity and the Dell SC Series (Compellent) going forward. Why? Let’s start with a look at what both product lines have brought to the combined business and then fast forward to see what the future holds.

The Dell EMC midrange businesses represent:

  • Market share of 29.4%, nearly double that of our nearest competitor.
  • Leadership across all price bands. [i]
  • $5 billion in combined revenues [ii] within a total addressable market of more than $17 billion.
  • More than 100,000 existing, passionate storage customers [iii], with the heritage of both EMC technologies well positioned in large enterprises and of Dell’s incredible strength in the entry-level and mid-markets.

entry and midrange

dell emc midrange 2

The Combined Dell EMC Midrange Portfolio – Go Forward from Today
Dell EMC’s midrange portfolio now has a scale and breadth that is without comparison in our industry. Our combined midrange offerings are the strongest they’ve ever been as, this year, we have launched new products such as Unity Flash storage systems and made powerful enhancements to the SC Series OS. This all adds up to a combined portfolio for our customers and partners that is unmatched elsewhere in the industry. (more…)

Now that Data Centers are Bursting at the Seams is it Time to Modernize?

Guy Churchward

President, Core Technologies Division
Guy Churchward is President of Core Technologies at EMC Corporation. He is responsible for a division that is redefining storage, through a comprehensive portfolio of core storage solutions encompassing the award-winning VMAX, VNX, VNXe, XtremIO, VPLEX, and Data Domain technologies and a cutting-edge software portfolio that delivers simplified storage systems management, continuous availability, replication, backup, and archive solutions. Churchward has more than 27 years of experience in the IT industry, with broad international experience that spans executive management, engineering, sales, marketing and business development capacities. He joined EMC in May 2012, when he served as Senior Vice President of Engineering for the Backup & Recovery Systems Division, before becoming Division President in October 2012. He was appointed to lead the Core Technologies Division in October 2014. Prior to joining EMC, Churchward was President and CEO of LogLogic, an enterprise log and security intelligence platform company. He has also served as Vice President and General Manager of the Data Protection Group at NetApp, where he was responsible for product strategy and development of the company's portfolio of disk-to-disk and disaster recovery products, as well as Vice President and General Manager of BEA's WebLogic Products Group. In addition, he has held senior management positions at Sun Microsystems (formerly Tarantella Inc.), The Santa Cruz Operation (formerly IXI), Accenture (formerly Binder Hamlyn) and Olivetti. Churchward holds an Executive MBA from Stanford Business School and studied computer science at Cambridge Tutors College, England.

When you live in an older house, where the layout doesn’t really work for the way you live your life and there aren’t enough closets to satiate your wife’s shoe fetish, maybe it’s time to modernize! But do you knock the whole house down and start again? Maybe it’s tempting but, what about the investment that you’ve already made in your home? The bathroom you had refitted last year or the wiring you had redone? And where are you going to live during the whole inevitably elongated process?

home-remodel

It’s similar when you want to modernize your IT infrastructure: you have money sunk into your existing technology – probably still amortized for a year or two into the future – and you don’t want to face the disruption of completely starting again. We call this investment hangover ‘tech debt’.

For many companies, this debt includes a strategy for data storage that takes advantage of a shrinking per-gig cost of storage that enables them to keep everything. And that data is probably stored primarily on spinning disk with some high-availability workloads on flash in their primary data center. The old way of doing things was to see volumes of data growing and address that on a point basis with more spinning disk.

But, just like the house we mentioned earlier, data centers are bursting at the seams and it’s now time to modernize – but how?

Read the full blog here to learn how to get started!

Are You Lost in the Fog of Technical Debt?

Guy Churchward

President, Core Technologies Division
Guy Churchward is President of Core Technologies at EMC Corporation. He is responsible for a division that is redefining storage, through a comprehensive portfolio of core storage solutions encompassing the award-winning VMAX, VNX, VNXe, XtremIO, VPLEX, and Data Domain technologies and a cutting-edge software portfolio that delivers simplified storage systems management, continuous availability, replication, backup, and archive solutions. Churchward has more than 27 years of experience in the IT industry, with broad international experience that spans executive management, engineering, sales, marketing and business development capacities. He joined EMC in May 2012, when he served as Senior Vice President of Engineering for the Backup & Recovery Systems Division, before becoming Division President in October 2012. He was appointed to lead the Core Technologies Division in October 2014. Prior to joining EMC, Churchward was President and CEO of LogLogic, an enterprise log and security intelligence platform company. He has also served as Vice President and General Manager of the Data Protection Group at NetApp, where he was responsible for product strategy and development of the company's portfolio of disk-to-disk and disaster recovery products, as well as Vice President and General Manager of BEA's WebLogic Products Group. In addition, he has held senior management positions at Sun Microsystems (formerly Tarantella Inc.), The Santa Cruz Operation (formerly IXI), Accenture (formerly Binder Hamlyn) and Olivetti. Churchward holds an Executive MBA from Stanford Business School and studied computer science at Cambridge Tutors College, England.

Many customers are navigating through what they describe as ‘the fog’ when it comes to balancing their IT budgets across where they were, where they are and where they need to be.technical debt

It starts with managing “Technical Debt”; loosely described as the legacy IT infrastructure that a CIO inherits or accumulates over time. It’s viewed as being costly and cumbersome, but it isn’t going anywhere anytime soon either. The investments that are being made in this environment are those that result in reducing costs, lowering debt and freeing up money that can be invested in critical green field opportunities.

So how do you manage “Technical Debt” and your investments moving forward? Well here’s something that was shared with me recently that I thought had great promise

Want to learn more? Read my full Reflections blog here.

Which Camera Lens is Your Storage Environment?

Guy Churchward

President, Core Technologies Division
Guy Churchward is President of Core Technologies at EMC Corporation. He is responsible for a division that is redefining storage, through a comprehensive portfolio of core storage solutions encompassing the award-winning VMAX, VNX, VNXe, XtremIO, VPLEX, and Data Domain technologies and a cutting-edge software portfolio that delivers simplified storage systems management, continuous availability, replication, backup, and archive solutions. Churchward has more than 27 years of experience in the IT industry, with broad international experience that spans executive management, engineering, sales, marketing and business development capacities. He joined EMC in May 2012, when he served as Senior Vice President of Engineering for the Backup & Recovery Systems Division, before becoming Division President in October 2012. He was appointed to lead the Core Technologies Division in October 2014. Prior to joining EMC, Churchward was President and CEO of LogLogic, an enterprise log and security intelligence platform company. He has also served as Vice President and General Manager of the Data Protection Group at NetApp, where he was responsible for product strategy and development of the company's portfolio of disk-to-disk and disaster recovery products, as well as Vice President and General Manager of BEA's WebLogic Products Group. In addition, he has held senior management positions at Sun Microsystems (formerly Tarantella Inc.), The Santa Cruz Operation (formerly IXI), Accenture (formerly Binder Hamlyn) and Olivetti. Churchward holds an Executive MBA from Stanford Business School and studied computer science at Cambridge Tutors College, England.

The real point of my blog today, The Best Lens to Choose for Your Storage Environment, was to make sense of the many movements in the primary storage market.  Thinking about when and how I use my various cameras offered a way see how our customers think about choosing the right storage solution for their adventure.

 The Canon EOS is like EMC’s VMAX.  No compromises, with the lenses being the data services.  Interestingly, both EMC and Canon realize that the value of these products IS the lens and the camera back but each is valuable separately, not indelibly conjoined.  The new VMAX architecture separates the data services from the back-end storage with technologies such as Federated Tiered Storage (FTS) and ViPR, but you can take full advantage of these features with alternate storage. (more…)

The Quest for Solid Ground: How Global Enterprises Are Grappling with New Data Protection Demands

Guy Churchward

President, Core Technologies Division
Guy Churchward is President of Core Technologies at EMC Corporation. He is responsible for a division that is redefining storage, through a comprehensive portfolio of core storage solutions encompassing the award-winning VMAX, VNX, VNXe, XtremIO, VPLEX, and Data Domain technologies and a cutting-edge software portfolio that delivers simplified storage systems management, continuous availability, replication, backup, and archive solutions. Churchward has more than 27 years of experience in the IT industry, with broad international experience that spans executive management, engineering, sales, marketing and business development capacities. He joined EMC in May 2012, when he served as Senior Vice President of Engineering for the Backup & Recovery Systems Division, before becoming Division President in October 2012. He was appointed to lead the Core Technologies Division in October 2014. Prior to joining EMC, Churchward was President and CEO of LogLogic, an enterprise log and security intelligence platform company. He has also served as Vice President and General Manager of the Data Protection Group at NetApp, where he was responsible for product strategy and development of the company's portfolio of disk-to-disk and disaster recovery products, as well as Vice President and General Manager of BEA's WebLogic Products Group. In addition, he has held senior management positions at Sun Microsystems (formerly Tarantella Inc.), The Santa Cruz Operation (formerly IXI), Accenture (formerly Binder Hamlyn) and Olivetti. Churchward holds an Executive MBA from Stanford Business School and studied computer science at Cambridge Tutors College, England.

394320-bnr-DPAD-Q4-Data-Protection-Index-300x250

According to the EMC Global Data Protection Index, which surveyed 3,300 IT decision makers from mid-size to enterprise-class businesses across 24 countries, common data protection practices have left global businesses exposed to data loss and downtime to the tune of $1.7 trillion annually. For the sake of comparison, that’s about the same as the world’s total military spend in a single year. A startling statistic by any account! And this is only a glimpse of what’s to come if attitudes and practices toward data protection are left unchanged. (more…)

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