Archive for the ‘Cloud Data Protection’ Category

The Cloud Is the Perfect Vehicle for Data…and Data Protection

Brian Heckert

Principal Content Editor, Dell EMC
My first long-term exposure to technology was the typewriter. I still love that invention, which really sparked my interest in writing. For the past 20 years, I have worked in high tech as a content development specialist, marketing writer, and documentation editor. Prior to working in the software industry, I was a journalist, photographer, photo editor, and military fire fighter. After hours, I enjoy spending time with family, reading, and hiking in the mountains.

The end of cloud computing? Don’t hold your breath!

Recently I watched a video about how cloud computing has run its course. The headline—The End of Cloud Computing—grabbed my attention (that was the point, of course). But there’s just one thing: it’s not true!

The premise is that many of the future devices both large and small that we will depend on daily will need to collect real-world data in real time. That means lots of data real fast. For example, to operate safely, self-driving cars need information—and lots of it. While they’re maneuvering, self-driving cars gather incredible amounts on information—more than 1 GB per second—and use it quickly to ensure maximum safety for everyone on the road. The process requires sensors in the car to collect data about road conditions, make inferences about those conditions, and then act with extreme agility.

cloud data protection

The process of sensing, inferring, and then acting quickly and accurately makes a lot of sense for a self-driving vehicle when we consider that a wrong “decision” by the vehicle could cause an accident, resulting in damaged property, or worse, bodily injury to vehicle occupants or pedestrians. That means data needs to be onboard the vehicle, which becomes a “moving” data center.

But here’s the thing: not all data centers need to be moving. While an “onboard” data center makes sense for a self-driving car, there are vast amounts of information that reside comfortably in the cloud. And that isn’t going to change. These days most of our devices and how we use them depend on a data-gathering process that occurs centrally in the cloud. The device in use pings the cloud and then information in the cloud is returned. For example, when you do a Google search or use your favorite app, the cloud is the perfect vehicle from which to grab the necessary data.

And what about business-critical data? The cloud is the perfect vehicle for enterprise IT. In fact, today many organizations are given mandates to store a certain percentage of the business’s data in the cloud. Why? It’s economical and it’s safe—practical reasons that reduce TCO. These days, who doesn’t want to reduce TCO? (more…)

2016: Year of the Cybercriminal

Brian Heckert

Principal Content Editor, Dell EMC
My first long-term exposure to technology was the typewriter. I still love that invention, which really sparked my interest in writing. For the past 20 years, I have worked in high tech as a content development specialist, marketing writer, and documentation editor. Prior to working in the software industry, I was a journalist, photographer, photo editor, and military fire fighter. After hours, I enjoy spending time with family, reading, and hiking in the mountains.

cyberattackUS$1,000,000,000. That’s the estimated cost of ransomware to individuals and businesses in 2016. In the first quarter of 2016 alone, ransomware cost organizations US$209 million. Keep in mind that ransomware is just one type of cybercriminal activity. Although final numbers for 2016 are not yet known, based on the frequency and sophistication of the attacks so far, it’s likely that 2016 will end up as the most lucrative year on record for cybercriminals. The latest numbers show that there were more than 2 billion records leaked in 2016.

Here are just a few of the biggest cyberattacks in 2016:

Government
Even the U.S. government is not immune to cyberattacks. In February, the Department of Justice was attacked by hackers who published contact information of 20,000 FBI employees. That was just a day after the same hackers posted contact information of 10,000 Department of Homeland Security employees. Shortly after these attacks, the cybercriminals taunted the Feds, stating that they did what they said they would do.

High tech
Data from at least 500 million user accounts was stolen from Yahoo! users. The cybersecurity breach actually occurred in 2014 but was only confirmed by Yahoo! this past September. According to Yahoo!, “The account information may have included names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords (the vast majority with bcrypt) and, in some cases, encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers.”

Healthcare
Hospitals operated by the $5 billion healthcare provider MedStar Health were attacked by ransomware in March. Thousands of patient records could not be updated and in some cases could not even be accessed by healthcare staff. As a result, patients were turned away or were treated without important computer records.

Education
A data breach at the University of California, Berkeley, affected the institution earlier in the year, compromising the financial data of 80,000 students, alumni, employees and former employees. The hackers exposed Social Security and bank account numbers. The breach occurred when software was being patched.

No organization is immune
The attacks just mentioned are just a few of the thousands of cybercrimes that occur worldwide each day. Government, high tech, healthcare, education, etc.—no one is immune from a cyberattack. Cleary, if you’re connected, you’re vulnerable. Fortunately, there are precautions you can take to prevent a cybersecurity disaster. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (which is the lead federal agency for investigating cyberattacks), you can protect yourself and your organization from cyberattacks by: (more…)

Ransomware Hits Light-rail System, Resulting in Lost Revenue

Brian Heckert

Principal Content Editor, Dell EMC
My first long-term exposure to technology was the typewriter. I still love that invention, which really sparked my interest in writing. For the past 20 years, I have worked in high tech as a content development specialist, marketing writer, and documentation editor. Prior to working in the software industry, I was a journalist, photographer, photo editor, and military fire fighter. After hours, I enjoy spending time with family, reading, and hiking in the mountains.

Ransomware really gets around, faster than even the best form of mass transportation can move busy commuters to work.

ransomware-on-the-rail

Recently, ransomware caused the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Authority (SFMTA) light-rail system to lose revenue when the organization shut down ticket machines and fare gates as a precaution to the malware attack. According to the SFMTA site, ransomware infected mainly 900 office computers. However, another source claimed that more than 2,000 computers were infected, including office admin desktops, CAD workstations, email and print servers, employee laptops, payroll systems, SQL databases, lost and found property terminals and station kiosk PCs.

The ransomware scrambled the data on infected hard drives, posted a message on corresponding computers (“You Hacked, ALL Data Encrypted, Contact For Key (cryptom27@yandex.com) ID:601.”), then demanded a 100 Bitcoin ransom (approximately US$75,000) before the cybercriminals would agree to hand over a master decryption key that would allow the SFMTA to decipher the data ransomed on the infected hard drives.

Ransomware is a threat to businesses that already costs millions of dollars each year, and unfortunately is prevalent and grows more sophisticated. There are literally millions of new malware variants each year. In 2015 there were 431 million variants added, according to the Internet Security Threat Report.

Using a variety of attacks, criminals can inject malware into your network, which then holds your data or other systems hostage until you pay a ransom. Ransomware gains access to a computer system through a network’s weakest link, which is typically a user’s email or social networking site. Once a user clicks on a malicious link or opens an infected attachment, the malware spreads quickly throughout the system.

When a file or other data is held for ransom, the affected organization must meet the financial demands of the cybercriminal in exchange for a decryption key to “unlock” the ransomed data. If you don’t pay the ransom, you forfeit access to your computer and the data that’s on it. You also forfeit access for others to shared documents and data, compounding the impact exponentially. You might think that’s the worst case. Not so. (more…)

Oh, There’s No Place Like Las Vegas for the Holidays

Dave Robinson

Sr. Director Product Marketing, Dell EMC
Dave is a 10-year EMC veteran, responsible for the marketing behind Dell EMC’s portfolio of data protection cloud products and technologies. A California native and graduate of the University of Utah, Dave started his career in advertising, building integrated marketing campaigns for a large healthcare client. The allure of technology was too hard to resist so he took the leap and never looked back. Outside of work, he may be found in the mountains, on a lake, reading a great history book, or coaching youth baseball. Dave is married with 4 children.

Latest posts by Dave Robinson (see all)

AWS-reinvent-conference-las-vegas

As the last few leaves drop from the trees and warm sunny afternoons give way to cold winter nights, it can mean only one thing… the holidays are near. Like many of you, I am a firm believer that late November through early January is indeed “the most wonderful time of the year,” as Andy Williams first crooned back in 1963. It’s a time for binge eating, reconnecting with friends and family and in the case of the Robinson family, movie marathons! One of my most cherished traditions the past few years has been introducing my kids to the holiday classics that I grew up on; “A Christmas Story,” “It’s a Wonderful Life,” “Elf,” and “Home Alone” to name a few.

 

aws-data-protection

Image provided by Google images

In “Home Alone,” the McCallister family vacation takes a turn for the worse when eight-year-old Kevin is left behind as a result of an overnight storm and ensuing power outage. <Spoiler Alert!> As a result of his cleverness, a few household items, and a newfound friend, Kevin is ultimately able to protect his home against a pair of bungling intruders.

For enterprise IT, unwanted intruders, bungling or sophisticated, are no laughing matter. At Dell EMC, we’re committed to protecting all of our customer’s data against unwelcome intruders, power outages, ransomware and more. Physical or virtual. Data center or public cloud. North Carolina or North Pole. No data is out of reach for Dell EMC data protection solutions.

To that end, Dell EMC is a bronze sponsor of the AWS re:Invent 2016 conference, which kicks off today at the Sands Expo in Las Vegas. With the sweet scent of Starbucks Pumpkin Chai lattes drifting through the air, the more than 20,000 attendees can network with cloud experts, engage in hands-on labs, attend boot camps and more. Come visit Dell EMC at booth #947 in the Expo Hall to talk to the experts about data protection solutions from Data Domain and NetWorker with CloudBoost for the AWS platform.

Data Domain Cloud Tier allows you to natively tier data to Amazon S3 object storage for long-term retention. As you would expect from Data Domain, only unique data is sent directly to AWS for a highly efficient and cost-effective long-term retention solution. We’ll also be offering demos of NetWorker with CloudBoost for protecting enterprise applications running on Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). NetWorker with CloudBoost runs completely self-contained within the AWS EC2 environment and includes client-side optimized backups, inline de-duplication, encryption and compression with backup directly to Amazon S3. (more…)

Backing Up Your Data Should Be a Routine, Not a Tradition

David Tye

Product Marketing Manager
As a recent graduate from Sacramento State University I am able to take what I have learned in school and apply it to the high tech industry and the problems companies are facing today. I am a California native, die hard Green Bay Packers fan, and an outdoor enthusiast.

Latest posts by David Tye (see all)

With the holiday season upon us, it’s time to break out the lights, decorations, gifts and, of course, good food. Thanksgiving is a time for all of us to give thanks and spend time with the ones we love. Like many families, my family partakes in a variety of holiday traditions. Every Turkey Day we bring out the “Giving Tree.” The Giving Tree contains blank leaves, which are filled out anonymously with phrases and sayings of what each of us is thankful for. After dinner, each leaf is pulled off the tree and read aloud. Family members then have to guess which leaf belongs to whom. I’ll give you a hint: any leaf that mentions the Green Bay Packers is probably mine.

People Talking Celebrating Thanksgiving Holiday Concept

The Giving Tree is a one-time occurrence that takes place on the night of Thanksgiving. Backing up your data, on the other hand, is something that needs to be routine. The most important information that resides on any endpoint is your data. Operating systems and applications can be reinstalled relatively easily; however, getting your original data back is not so easy. Backing up your data is paramount when it comes to data protection. According to the Global Data Protection Index, a third-party study that surveyed 2,200 IT decision makers across 18 countries, 30% of respondents had lost data in the last 12 months!

There are a variety of methods you can use to back up data. In the past, backing up data to an external hard drive or tape was standard operating procedure. In today’s IT landscape, businesses large and small are adopting more modern and automated approaches such as cloud backup. Backing up data has moved from a cumbersome manual process to a simple automated process in a relatively short amount of time. For example, Mozy by Dell lets you log in to an easy-to-use admin console and set backups to happen automatically on a weekly, daily or hourly cadence, depending on user needs. (more…)

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