Posts Tagged ‘all flash’

Rain or Shine… Show Must Go On

Aaron Bairos

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC, Data Protection
Aaron is currently pursuing a master’s degree at Brandeis University and a Product Marketing Manager at Dell EMC. He’s been with Dell EMC/RSA for over 5 years now across multiple roles in security and data protection. When not working he enjoys being a tourist in new cities and spending time with family and friends. Follow him on Twitter: @AaronBairos

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Affordable Unified Array-Based Protection and Recovery Solution for the Midrange

Since being announced in May of 2016, the Dell EMC Unity™ family of midrange has been globally adopted by over 1,800 customers across varying markets. More and more, small-to-medium-size businesses (SMBs) are rapidly adopting Unity storage to run their businesses and virtualized workloads. Unity’s main design principles — Simple, Modern, Flexible and Affordable – have strongly resonated with SMBs struggling with reduced budgets and constrained resources that has since given rise to the ‘IT generalist’ – those being called upon inside these organizations to handle a wide array of IT technologies and products without intrinsic specialty skills.

But not to worry – that’s exactly the business profile Unity was designed to address with its unparalleled simplicity across the entire storage lifecycle – acquisition to set-up and install to configuration and management to service and support. And it’s why SMBs – and IT generalists – are energetically jumping on board with Dell EMC Unity.

Let’s spotlight one area where Unity’s simplicity and all-inclusive software model can streamline a relatively complex IT process or specialty – data replication for virtualizedapplications in VMware environments.  First, the new HTML5 management interface gets Unity configured for VMware environments in just a few minutes. And secondly, Unity includes the Dell EMC RecoverPoint for Virtual Machines™ (RP4VMs) software along with 15 free licenses with every Unity system.  RP4VMs running on Unity storage enables IT generalists to simply and efficiently create a disaster recovery solution for VMware virtualized environments. SMBs can affordably establish local and remote protection (and migration) plans for their businesses with this robust hypervisor-based replication solution with continuous data protection for per-VM recovery to any point in time, and built-in automated disaster recovery orchestration.

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Let’s look at a couple of scenarios where Unity and RP4VMs can make a significant difference for SMBs and IT generalists trying to provide a full complement of data protection, recovery, and migration services – affordably, efficiently, and easily.

Use Cases
Hypothetically, ABC Capital, Inc. is a major financial institution that accepts deposits, offers checking account services, makes business, personal and mortgage loans. They needed a disaster recovery solution for their large scale VMware environment that they could depend on to hold all of this important information. Their mission critical data base can’t afford to lose a days’ worth of work and they were looking to further invest in protecting their data. Fortunately, with RecoverPoint for Virtual Machines, if there were something to occur at one site, they still have another site to pick up the slack.  RecoverPoint for Virtual Machines reduces WAN bandwidth consumption by up to 90%.  It also ensures replication robustness, sustaining poor WAN conditions with up to 300 milliseconds of latency and up to a 5% packet loss. With the replication capabilities of RP4VMs, ABC Capital, Inc. can ensure that their business is sustained in the event of disaster. RecoverPoint for Virtual Machines running on their Unity all-flash array allows ABC Capital to have a Unity at their primary site and a re-purposed VNX2 on their secondary site. This gives them a replication tool that supports all Dell EMC storage platforms. RecoverPoint for Virtual Machines is the replication tool of choice for Dell EMC across the board and we’re the only vendor that offers remote protection over synchronous distances. (more…)

Performance Testing Made Simpler with iCDM

Bala Chandrasekaran

Principal Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC
Bala Chandrasekaran is a Principal Product Marketing Manager at Dell EMC and delivers marketing efforts for All Flash primary storage. He brings to Dell EMC his 12 years of IT industry experience across various customer facing roles including pre-sales, consulting and technical services. He is a certified professional in IBM DB2 and Oracle Databases. He has an undergraduate engineering degree from Anna University, India and MBA from Foster School of Business of University of Washington.

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At the recently concluded Oracle Open World show in San Francisco, many mutual customers of Oracle and Dell EMC shared how their organizations benefited from the consistent low IO response time from Dell EMC All Flash storage.

In one of the conversations, a DBA mentioned that having production databases on all flash storage while the test databases are on a slower disk-based storage system posed interesting challenges in database performance tuning and diagnosis. He went on to share how ‘Top Wait events’ on the Oracle AWR reports and the access paths suggested by the SQL Explain reports were different across production and test databases. Since the test databases were hosted on a slower disk-based storage system, he said, the application wait events observed in production were hidden behind the “User IO” class wait events in the test.

Traditionally, IT teams’ approach for performance testing has been to manage a production-like infrastructure with complete production data. When time is of the essence, database specialists would migrate the schema statistics from production and use optimizer hints on SQLs to influence database optimizer in order to pick a particular access path.

Although the proactive performance testing ahead of going live helps to reduce risk, these approaches have been complex, time consuming, and cost prohibitive. While the benefits of all flash storage are obvious for production environments, justifying flash-based media for test databases has been difficult.

I’m happy to share that, now, database and application teams can unlock Rapid Tuning with integrated Copy Data Management (iCDM) available on Dell EMC All Flash Storage. Be it for either diagnosing a performance problem in production or evaluating the performance in the application development lifecycle, it is very easy to make a high-performance application-consistent copy of a database on Dell EMC All Flash Storage in a space-efficient way.

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Consolidation of performance-sensitive non-production databases as virtual copies on Dell EMC all flash arrays automatically simplifies database operational activities such as upgrade and patching required ahead of testing. Since the test database copies also inherit the enterprise-class data services such as encryption and compression, the I/O performance would be completely comparable to that in production. (more…)

Winning the Olympic Gold and Modernizing the Data Center shouldn’t be a Flash in the Pan

Sebastian Yiang

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC Core Technologies, Asia Pacific and Japan
I started out in the IT industry almost 20 years ago as a systems analyst in a large telco within its Internet Service Provider BU to drive product and business development of consumer and enterprise Internet services. I then had the opportunity to do business development and product marketing for connected consumer electronics, web hosting and data center services, and storage solutions before I joined EMC. My current role at Dell EMC is product marketing for Data Protection and Availability Division for Asia Pacific and Japan region. I am based in sunny Singapore and enjoy traveling with my family.

all-flash-olympicsIt was August 12th. The 100m butterfly finals at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games glued a nation of 5 million to their television sets as their national swimmer Joseph Schooling competed with the Games’ most medaled and legendary Michael Phelps. Smashing the Olympic, Asian and national records, Schooling became the world’s fastest butterfly specialist and brought home Singapore’s first-ever Olympic Gold medal. Schooling has taught us many valuable lessons. His achievement shows us that we can all achieve our dreams if we set our goals, take actions and stick to the game plan, despite facing challenges and failures along the journey.

What lessons can enterprise IT learn from this success story?

 

 

Review and Update Your Business and IT Goals
At the age of 14, Schooling met his idol Michael Phelps in Singapore back in 2008 when the United States Olympic swim team stopped over for a training camp before the Beijing Olympics. Eight years later, he beat his idol with an Olympic record of 50.39 seconds in the 100m butterfly event. Schooling revealed in a local press interview that Phelps helped to inspire him to achieve Olympic glory. His goal is nothing less than a gold medal. With his Olympic dream in mind, Schooling gave himself a higher goal after achieving major milestones.

Many IT professionals have personal goals in their career. But how many know their organization’s business and IT goals? For enterprise IT to achieve success in positively impacting the organization’s business and growth, there must be a strategic goal and plan that motivates every IT personnel. Otherwise, disengaged and unmotivated staff affects IT productivity and staff morale, and even derails your goals.

Most IT organizations have strategic goals to optimize or modernize their data centers through the deployment of virtualization, cloud, software-defined and open platform technologies. With flash drives becoming more affordable over the last few years, compression technologies and business requirement for always-on mission-critical applications, many IT organizations are now looking to modernize their data centers with all flash storage arrays and relegating traditional disk to bulk and archive storage requirements.

If you have not considered an all-flash storage strategy for your data center, this IDC infobrief on global flash technology adoption dated Feb 2016 may change your mind. It concludes that “flash is unlocking innovation and enabling business transformation”. (more…)

Tips for Running a Database as a Service

Yoav Eilat

Director of Product Marketing, Dell EMC
Yoav is Director of Product Marketing at Dell EMC, driving the marketing efforts for database and application solutions. He joined the EMC XtremIO team from Oracle, where he spent several years in the applications, middleware and enterprise management product teams. Yoav has an extensive background in enterprise software and data center technologies, and holds a B.Sc. in mathematics and computer science from Tel Aviv University and an MBA from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Database as a Service (DBaaS) is becoming another one of those industry buzzwords that can mean almost anything. Obviously it has something to do with running databases in a cloud model. But technology vendors don’t hesitate to apply that term to any product that’s even remotely related to that topic. Database software? Yep, that’s DBaaS. Storage arrays for your database? That’s DBaaS too. A coffee machine? Probably!

For a serious discussion about DBaaS, it’s useful to look at the state of databases today. Data is the foundation on which modern businesses are built, and much of it lives in commonly used databases such as Oracle Database or Microsoft SQL Server. Database sprawl and the resultant explosive growth of database copies represent an enormous challenge for enterprise IT teams. In an IDC survey, 77% of enterprise IT decision makers said they have more than 200 instances of Oracle Databases or Microsoft SQL Servers in their data centers.

db-as-a-service

Source: IDC Data Management Survey for EMC, November, 2015

In the same survey, more than 80% said they have more than 10 copies of each given production instance, typically for development, testing, data center operations, analytics, data protection or disaster recovery. While database copies are critical for these business activities, database administrators have often been reluctant to expand the number of database copies, due to the hardware, software and administrative costs involved.

And it’s not just about costs: these databases are typically not standardized, and comprise of a wide range of versions, patch levels and configurations. This sprawl and lack of standardization make it challenging to manage governance and compliance, and to meet service-level agreements. Inefficient management tools and a lack of visibility into the copy infrastructure can exacerbate these challenges.

So how can databases be made available to critical business activities while keeping costs under control and delivering quick service and time to market? How do you set up an efficient cloud environment that will reduce complexity, ensure data availability and accelerate business processes? Let’s go through a checklist for making sure your DBaaS initiative is a success.  (more…)

Tales from EMC World 2016: Building a Modern Data Center

Last year we built a data center as part of our efforts to display our full portfolio of products at EMC World. We would have never imagined the level of interaction and interest we received with hundreds of customers coming through the exhibit every day. Our customers, partners, and internal EMC folks love technology and there is no better way to get a ‘feel’ for it than actually touching it.

This year we decided to do the same thing showcasing some of the most exciting technology advances in years. We organized our live modern data center by 5 key pillars:

Building a modern data center 2

Flash – everyone understands the benefits of Flash from a performance perspective, mainly delivering predictable low response times. But supply-side innovation is allowing us to embed much denser 3D-NAND technologies delivering unprecedented density and lowering CAPEX and OPEX in ways not possible before. All Flash arrays make more sense than ever and we showcased the coolest kids on the block:

  • Unity All Flash systems combining the benefits of flash with unprecedented efficiency and simplicity. Unity is built with end-to-end simplicity in mind bringing innovation like an HTML5-based GUI and a REST API to simplify operations. We also previewed CloudIQ, a cloud-based analytics dashboard to address and manage larger topologies much more proactively.
  • VMAX All Flash combining the benefits of flash with uncontended data services and availability features like SRDF. Through the integration with CloudArray customers can be strategic about their hybrid cloud strategy. Flash where you need it and cloud where you don’t.
  • XtremIO is the uncontended all flash array market leader delivering integrated copy data management capabilities allowing customers to leverage flash in ways they could never before. Being able to deliver copies on demand means better business agility. Being able to do so without tradeoffs around performance and efficiency is the hallmark of the XtremIO architecture and something competitors struggle to match.
  • One interesting addition to our data center this year was DSSD which helps our customers get business outcomes faster than ever before by essentially stripping code out of the IO path while preserving the benefits of shared storage. Server-side flash has often been used but leads to stranded storage and the need to shuffle data around, limited capacity, and no enterprise features to secure the data set. Compare that to DSSD D5, which can provide 144TB capacity, deliver 10MM IOPS at microseconds response times, all in 5U.

(more…)

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