Posts Tagged ‘cloud’

Data Protection Everywhere: Droning on about Converged Infrastructure Data Protection

Tom Giuliano

Principal Product Marketing Manager, Data Protection Management Software Solutions
For 17 years, Tom has brought storage, data protection, security and wireless products to market through roles in product marketing, product management and sales. He loves to speak with customers and prospects about their business goals and challenges, their experiences and their needs, and has had a lot of opportunity to do it. Backed with a master’s degree in Engineering and an MBA, Tom is equally comfortable digging into the details with technical personnel as well as translating and delivering the business value story. But honestly – TELLING STORIES is SO much more FUN for him! Tom's current role in product marketing focuses on data protection management solutions and management strategy. He gets to spend his days thinking about how to help you simplify and enhance your experience achieving your data protection objectives. When not driving go-to-market initiatives, identifying unique and creative methods to build product awareness or launching new and innovative offerings, you’ll likely find him cycling, skiing, boating or running. And, who knows, maybe you’ll hear some of more of his interesting experiences in a future post from time to time.

Drones.  Quadcopters.  Small remote-controlled flying vehicles.  Whatever you want to call them, they were THE hot item this holiday season.  I had two orders cancelled by Amazon once they determined they were accepting orders beyond inventory capacity.  It was a miracle I was finally able to find one for my son at a local store.

converged infrastructure drone 1

As an 11 year old, my son was initially challenged with the vehicle controls.  The controller had 2 joysticks, 2 elevation buttons, a start button, a “trick” button, trim/elevation/turning fine-tuning buttons, takeoff and landing buttons and a LCD display.  And learning how to manage the vehicle occurred only after he had manually built much of the tiny aircraft.  That’s a lot for anyone to accomplish in short time before they can get value (fun!) out of it.  And even then, I still needed to be in the flight area to protect pictures, lamps and the cats from being hit.

converged infrastructure drone 2 (more…)

Experiences that Meet Expectations

Tom Giuliano

Principal Product Marketing Manager, Data Protection Management Software Solutions
For 17 years, Tom has brought storage, data protection, security and wireless products to market through roles in product marketing, product management and sales. He loves to speak with customers and prospects about their business goals and challenges, their experiences and their needs, and has had a lot of opportunity to do it. Backed with a master’s degree in Engineering and an MBA, Tom is equally comfortable digging into the details with technical personnel as well as translating and delivering the business value story. But honestly – TELLING STORIES is SO much more FUN for him! Tom's current role in product marketing focuses on data protection management solutions and management strategy. He gets to spend his days thinking about how to help you simplify and enhance your experience achieving your data protection objectives. When not driving go-to-market initiatives, identifying unique and creative methods to build product awareness or launching new and innovative offerings, you’ll likely find him cycling, skiing, boating or running. And, who knows, maybe you’ll hear some of more of his interesting experiences in a future post from time to time.

I recently found myself standing at one end of a large field.  People were everywhere and it was extremely loud.  It was 37 degrees Fahrenheit and raining.  I think I even saw a few snowflakes mixed in.  I stood there soaked and shaking, but didn’t mind.  I was cold and wet on the outside, but was glowing with pride on the inside.

Besides, I had experienced this before (dozens of times….) and knew what to expect.

Then I saw them – the lead group of runners of varsity girls cross country crested a rise toward the end of the first loop of their 5k race, which is the first time we had seen them in nearly five minutes.  Between the starting gun and then, every teammate and family member hoped their friend or child was running strong and not injured as they’d just run through narrow wooded trails littered with tree roots, loose stones and mud.

My daughter, who was first off the starting line on this particular day, had fallen back to 4th place.  I wasn’t worried though.  Her strategy was to remain in the front group for the majority of the race and sprint the final 200 yards to the finish.  She’s consistent and predictable, at least as much as any teen can be.  At least that’s been my experience, and her, and her coach’s, expectation.

After all, it’s about making sure the experience meets the expectation.

In June 2016 I wrote a blog titled “That Familiar Enterprise Experience in the Cloud”, which discussed how Dell EMC NetWorker protects cloud-resident workloads as an enterprise backup solution.  The most important take-away in that article was that NetWorker protects applications and data in the public cloud with THE SAME USER EXPERIENCE as when using NetWorker to back up on-premises workloads.  (more…)

Cloud Adoption: Strategy vs. Reality

Vladimir Mandic

Chief Technology Officer & Distinguished Engineer Data Protection Cloud, Core Technologies Division, Dell EMC
Vladimir has been driving technical innovation and change within EMC for the past 10 years, first in the area of data protection software and, currently, in cloud technologies. Prior to that, he’s had rich industry experience as a solution integrator and in the service provider space. When not working on technology innovation, he may be difficult to locate due to his passion for world travel.

Latest posts by Vladimir Mandic (see all)

Myths About Migrating to the Cloud

Myth 1: Cloud Bursting
One of the original highly publicized use-cases for public cloud was bursting. The story made sense: as your demand for computecloud adoption-vlad increased, you would use the public cloud to increase the capacity of your private infrastructure. Like so many good stories, bursting didn’t really happen. In fact, bursting is one of the least common public cloud use cases.
Why did bursting not become more widespread? Enterprises are either keeping applications on-premises in newly designed IaaS private clouds or they are moving them to the public cloud. It’s an OR function, not an AND one. Furthermore, it almost always happens per-application. You evaluate your future application needs and decide where it makes more sense to run the application for those needs. Bursting across environments is just too complex.

Myth 2: Multi-Cloud
Most enterprises have neither a comprehensive hybrid cloud nor an end-to-end multi-cloud strategy that covers entire IT cloud comic-vladenvironments. Frequently there is a general desire for multi-cloud strategy to minimize the dependency on a single cloud provider. But that strategy turns out again to be a per-application choice rather than a centralized plan.
Organizations choose to run some applications in the private cloud and some in different public clouds. Every cloud has very different functionality, interfaces, and cost optimizations. And each time an application developer chooses an environment, it’s because that cloud was the optimal choice for that application. As a result, application mobility becomes a myth; it’s something desired, but very few are willing to settle for the smallest common denominator between different choices just to enable application mobility.
Even if customers wanted to and could move the application, it’s unlikely to happen. Moving large amounts of data between environments is challenging, inefficient, and costly. So, once the choice of a cloud provider is made, the application stays where it is, at least until the next tech refresh cycle when per-application considerations can be re-evaluated.

Cloud Adoption for Legacy Applications
While so much of the focus has been on creating new applications, enterprises are also migrating traditional workloads. So what are the stages of cloud adoption?

  • Step 1: Infrastructure as a Service. Treat the cloud like a typical infrastructure; in other words, think of servers and storage as you currently think of them. Applications are installed on top of the infrastructure. Because everything is relatively generic, the choice of a cloud provider is not too critical.
    But as applications start to move, a new way of thinking evolves; you start looking at the infrastructure as services instead of servers.
  • Step 2: Software as a Service. Some legacy applications are swapped for new ones that run as a service. In this case, you don’t care where your SaaS service runs as long as it’s reliable. The choice of a cloud provider is even less relevant; it’s about choice of the SaaS solution itself.
  • Step 3: Rewrite the Application. Some applications are redesigned to be cloud-native. In some cases, the cloud is an excuse to rewrite decades of old COBOL code that nobody understands. In other cases, features of the cloud enable an application to scale more, run faster, and deliver better services. Not all applications should be rewritten.

The Core Issue: Data. When thinking about moving the applications, what’s left is the actual data, and that is where company value truly resides. Some data moves with applications where it resides, but not all data is application structured. And that is the last challenge of cloud adoption—looking how data services can enable global, timely, and secure access to all data, whether it resides inside an application or outside of it.

The Role of IT
Just what is the role of the central IT organization, and is there a single strategy for IT? Not really.
The word “strategy” comes not from having a single plan that covers all applications, but from a comprehensive evaluation that should be done before choices are made and from having a unified set of services that ensure security, availability, and reliability of all those different environments.

Consider how IT organizations are evolving to become service brokers. For example, sometimes:

  • It makes sense to build a private cloud based on new converged (or hyper-converged) infrastructure.
  • It may go with the software-defined data center (SDDC), but that is more the case of when they have to deal with unknown external consumers instead of explicit requirements
  • IT organizations will broker services from public cloud providers such as AWS, Azure, GCE, or VirtuStreamThe alternative is so-called “shadow IT” where each application team attempts to manage their own applications without understanding the global impacts of their choices. In such scenarios, security is typically first to go and data protection follows closely.

I’ve written before how with move to public cloud, the responsibility of infrastructure availability shifts to the cloud provider. But that does not negate the need for a comprehensive data protection strategy.

You still need to protect your data on-premises or in the cloud from external threats such as ransomware or internally caused data corruption events (as the application is frequently the cause of corruption, not just infrastructure failures), or from the common (and sometimes embarrassing) “threat” of “I deleted the wrong data and I need it back.”

Companies weigh the costs and benefits of any investment. There are places where different types of infrastructure deliver the right answer. For IT to remain relevant, it needs to support different types of environments. IT’s future is in delivering better on-premises services, becoming a service broker, and ensuring that data is securely stored and protected.

Conclusion
The cloud is real and it is part of every IT team’s life. IT can be instrumental in the successful adoption of the cloud, as long as they approach it with calmness and reason—and an open mind. The goal isn’t to design the world’s greatest hybrid cloud architecture. It’s about choice and designing for application services instead of looking at servers and storage separately from the applications. There will be well-designed private clouds and public clouds that are better fits for specific applications. But the applications will dictate what works best for them; they will not accept a least-common denominator hybrid cloud.
In the end, hybrid cloud is not a goal in itself; it is a result of a well-executed strategy for applications and data.

A Variety of Webinars to Fit Your Needs

Lauren Simpson

Principal Product Marketing Manager
Lauren is a Principal Product Marketing Manager at EMC working on the Experiential Marketing team. She helps drive customer-facing activities including engagement campaigns, events, webinar programs, and tradeshows. Outside of work, she enjoys traveling and spending time with her husband and two children.

Latest posts by Lauren Simpson (see all)

Are you curious about where your use case and product questions can be addressed? The Core Technologies team here at EMC has many ways to engage with you, at your convenience, to meet your needs. The most recent way to stay connected is our newly launched webinar series – a three-part program with different content and levels of complexity. There is a webinar to specifically address each unique facet of IT challenges.  This includes everything from cyber attacks, data duplication, complex application management, and data sprawl to the inability to support multiple virtual machines. If you have IT challenges, we have a solution to fit your needs.


TechTalk-Twitter

EMC Tech Talks
The tech talk series provides you with an inside look at managing your experience with our products. The focus is primarily based on one product at a time due to the technical nature of the content. We utilize simulators, GUIs, and animated videos to drive the 30-minute conversation and address your questions as they arise.

 

Modernize-Twitter


Modernize Without Compromise”
andAre You Protected?”
These two series highlight how to efficiently store, protect, and manage your information wherever it lives. Each session is approximately 60 minutes in length, and they all offer the opportunity to ask questions via chat.

 

 

Click here to be added to the webinar distribution list, ensuring that you receive the most up to date information on scheduling, topics, etc.

To view the upcoming schedules or view all of our previously recorded events click on one of the series names below:

We look forward to having you join our upcoming events!

That Familiar Enterprise Experience in the Cloud

Tom Giuliano

Principal Product Marketing Manager, Data Protection Management Software Solutions
For 17 years, Tom has brought storage, data protection, security and wireless products to market through roles in product marketing, product management and sales. He loves to speak with customers and prospects about their business goals and challenges, their experiences and their needs, and has had a lot of opportunity to do it. Backed with a master’s degree in Engineering and an MBA, Tom is equally comfortable digging into the details with technical personnel as well as translating and delivering the business value story. But honestly – TELLING STORIES is SO much more FUN for him! Tom's current role in product marketing focuses on data protection management solutions and management strategy. He gets to spend his days thinking about how to help you simplify and enhance your experience achieving your data protection objectives. When not driving go-to-market initiatives, identifying unique and creative methods to build product awareness or launching new and innovative offerings, you’ll likely find him cycling, skiing, boating or running. And, who knows, maybe you’ll hear some of more of his interesting experiences in a future post from time to time.

I drive a Honda Odyssey minivan.

Well, actually, it’s my wife’s van.  I use it for occasional trips to Home Depot, the landfill…that sort of thing.  And I’ll freely admit it…..I like driving the van (which I lovingly refer to as “the bus”).  It has tons of room, plenty of power, great visibility, it’s SUPER RELIABLE.

Until it’s not.

There was nothing really wrong with the van.  We faithfully have an authorized Honda dealer perform maintenance at the suggested intervals so it keeps delivering the reliability we’ve come to expect. It was simply time for its 110,000 mile checkup, and ironically the “check engine” light came on at 108K.  Talk about irony (or at least a reliable reminder!)

In any case, the dealer recommended new spark plugs, timing belt, water pump, oil change and cylinder recalibration.  I was suspicious of that last one but after looking into it agreed to the work.  It would take all day so I’d need to leave the car overnight and they offered me a rental car to get back to the office.

They called their preferred local car rental agency and requested a vehicle be delivered quickly.  I was happy to see the rental agent within 15 minutes, complete the paperwork and walk outside to see my temporary wheels.  That’s when my day went downhill.

web-jeep

I was staring at a very compact (is that overly redundant?) rental vehicle.  I won’t tell you what brand or model, but I can honestly tell you it was about the same size as my bike.  And it wasn’t even in great shape.  It had multiple dents and scratches in the bodywork and stains on the seats.  For the record my car is a mid-sized sedan and I am meticulous about keeping it clean.

This tiny rental was not at all what I expected.  In the past I’ve received rental vehicles of the same type and size of the car being worked on.  But, after all, the dealership covered the cost of the rental and I needed to get back to the office.  (more…)

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