Posts Tagged ‘Dell’

Tips for Running a Database as a Service

Yoav Eilat

Director of Product Marketing, Dell EMC
Yoav is Director of Product Marketing at Dell EMC, driving the marketing efforts for database and application solutions. He joined the EMC XtremIO team from Oracle, where he spent several years in the applications, middleware and enterprise management product teams. Yoav has an extensive background in enterprise software and data center technologies, and holds a B.Sc. in mathematics and computer science from Tel Aviv University and an MBA from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Database as a Service (DBaaS) is becoming another one of those industry buzzwords that can mean almost anything. Obviously it has something to do with running databases in a cloud model. But technology vendors don’t hesitate to apply that term to any product that’s even remotely related to that topic. Database software? Yep, that’s DBaaS. Storage arrays for your database? That’s DBaaS too. A coffee machine? Probably!

For a serious discussion about DBaaS, it’s useful to look at the state of databases today. Data is the foundation on which modern businesses are built, and much of it lives in commonly used databases such as Oracle Database or Microsoft SQL Server. Database sprawl and the resultant explosive growth of database copies represent an enormous challenge for enterprise IT teams. In an IDC survey, 77% of enterprise IT decision makers said they have more than 200 instances of Oracle Databases or Microsoft SQL Servers in their data centers.

db-as-a-service

Source: IDC Data Management Survey for EMC, November, 2015

In the same survey, more than 80% said they have more than 10 copies of each given production instance, typically for development, testing, data center operations, analytics, data protection or disaster recovery. While database copies are critical for these business activities, database administrators have often been reluctant to expand the number of database copies, due to the hardware, software and administrative costs involved.

And it’s not just about costs: these databases are typically not standardized, and comprise of a wide range of versions, patch levels and configurations. This sprawl and lack of standardization make it challenging to manage governance and compliance, and to meet service-level agreements. Inefficient management tools and a lack of visibility into the copy infrastructure can exacerbate these challenges.

So how can databases be made available to critical business activities while keeping costs under control and delivering quick service and time to market? How do you set up an efficient cloud environment that will reduce complexity, ensure data availability and accelerate business processes? Let’s go through a checklist for making sure your DBaaS initiative is a success.  (more…)

Cloud Adoption: Strategy vs. Reality

Vladimir Mandic

Chief Technology Officer & Distinguished Engineer Data Protection Cloud, Core Technologies Division, Dell EMC
Vladimir has been driving technical innovation and change within EMC for the past 10 years, first in the area of data protection software and, currently, in cloud technologies. Prior to that, he’s had rich industry experience as a solution integrator and in the service provider space. When not working on technology innovation, he may be difficult to locate due to his passion for world travel.

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Myths About Migrating to the Cloud

Myth 1: Cloud Bursting
One of the original highly publicized use-cases for public cloud was bursting. The story made sense: as your demand for computecloud adoption-vlad increased, you would use the public cloud to increase the capacity of your private infrastructure. Like so many good stories, bursting didn’t really happen. In fact, bursting is one of the least common public cloud use cases.
Why did bursting not become more widespread? Enterprises are either keeping applications on-premises in newly designed IaaS private clouds or they are moving them to the public cloud. It’s an OR function, not an AND one. Furthermore, it almost always happens per-application. You evaluate your future application needs and decide where it makes more sense to run the application for those needs. Bursting across environments is just too complex.

Myth 2: Multi-Cloud
Most enterprises have neither a comprehensive hybrid cloud nor an end-to-end multi-cloud strategy that covers entire IT cloud comic-vladenvironments. Frequently there is a general desire for multi-cloud strategy to minimize the dependency on a single cloud provider. But that strategy turns out again to be a per-application choice rather than a centralized plan.
Organizations choose to run some applications in the private cloud and some in different public clouds. Every cloud has very different functionality, interfaces, and cost optimizations. And each time an application developer chooses an environment, it’s because that cloud was the optimal choice for that application. As a result, application mobility becomes a myth; it’s something desired, but very few are willing to settle for the smallest common denominator between different choices just to enable application mobility.
Even if customers wanted to and could move the application, it’s unlikely to happen. Moving large amounts of data between environments is challenging, inefficient, and costly. So, once the choice of a cloud provider is made, the application stays where it is, at least until the next tech refresh cycle when per-application considerations can be re-evaluated.

Cloud Adoption for Legacy Applications
While so much of the focus has been on creating new applications, enterprises are also migrating traditional workloads. So what are the stages of cloud adoption?

  • Step 1: Infrastructure as a Service. Treat the cloud like a typical infrastructure; in other words, think of servers and storage as you currently think of them. Applications are installed on top of the infrastructure. Because everything is relatively generic, the choice of a cloud provider is not too critical.
    But as applications start to move, a new way of thinking evolves; you start looking at the infrastructure as services instead of servers.
  • Step 2: Software as a Service. Some legacy applications are swapped for new ones that run as a service. In this case, you don’t care where your SaaS service runs as long as it’s reliable. The choice of a cloud provider is even less relevant; it’s about choice of the SaaS solution itself.
  • Step 3: Rewrite the Application. Some applications are redesigned to be cloud-native. In some cases, the cloud is an excuse to rewrite decades of old COBOL code that nobody understands. In other cases, features of the cloud enable an application to scale more, run faster, and deliver better services. Not all applications should be rewritten.

The Core Issue: Data. When thinking about moving the applications, what’s left is the actual data, and that is where company value truly resides. Some data moves with applications where it resides, but not all data is application structured. And that is the last challenge of cloud adoption—looking how data services can enable global, timely, and secure access to all data, whether it resides inside an application or outside of it.

The Role of IT
Just what is the role of the central IT organization, and is there a single strategy for IT? Not really.
The word “strategy” comes not from having a single plan that covers all applications, but from a comprehensive evaluation that should be done before choices are made and from having a unified set of services that ensure security, availability, and reliability of all those different environments.

Consider how IT organizations are evolving to become service brokers. For example, sometimes:

  • It makes sense to build a private cloud based on new converged (or hyper-converged) infrastructure.
  • It may go with the software-defined data center (SDDC), but that is more the case of when they have to deal with unknown external consumers instead of explicit requirements
  • IT organizations will broker services from public cloud providers such as AWS, Azure, GCE, or VirtuStreamThe alternative is so-called “shadow IT” where each application team attempts to manage their own applications without understanding the global impacts of their choices. In such scenarios, security is typically first to go and data protection follows closely.

I’ve written before how with move to public cloud, the responsibility of infrastructure availability shifts to the cloud provider. But that does not negate the need for a comprehensive data protection strategy.

You still need to protect your data on-premises or in the cloud from external threats such as ransomware or internally caused data corruption events (as the application is frequently the cause of corruption, not just infrastructure failures), or from the common (and sometimes embarrassing) “threat” of “I deleted the wrong data and I need it back.”

Companies weigh the costs and benefits of any investment. There are places where different types of infrastructure deliver the right answer. For IT to remain relevant, it needs to support different types of environments. IT’s future is in delivering better on-premises services, becoming a service broker, and ensuring that data is securely stored and protected.

Conclusion
The cloud is real and it is part of every IT team’s life. IT can be instrumental in the successful adoption of the cloud, as long as they approach it with calmness and reason—and an open mind. The goal isn’t to design the world’s greatest hybrid cloud architecture. It’s about choice and designing for application services instead of looking at servers and storage separately from the applications. There will be well-designed private clouds and public clouds that are better fits for specific applications. But the applications will dictate what works best for them; they will not accept a least-common denominator hybrid cloud.
In the end, hybrid cloud is not a goal in itself; it is a result of a well-executed strategy for applications and data.

Let the Transformation Begin

Jamie Doherty

Consultant Social Media Engagement Manager, Dell EMC
Jamie brings over 20 years of experience in both traditional and digital marketing and has worked for companies like Direct to Retail Advertising, The Robb Report Magazine and Monster.com. She joined Dell EMC over four years ago to manage the Advanced Software Division’s social media strategy, and since then has taken on the challenge of managing the social media strategy for Dell EMC's Core Technologies Division. Her newest role will be managing Digital Campaigns for the Dell EMC Data Protection Division as well as leading strategy for Social Media in both the Data Protection and Storage Divisions. Jamie is also a Beachbody Coach helping to inspire others to live a healthier and more active lifestyle. When she is not Tweeting on behalf of Dell EMC or working out to Beachbody, you can find her at a live music venue watching her favorite artist or planning her next theme party. Follow her on Twitter @MnkyGrl47 or @CoachFab40

You may have heard in the news that a little merger happened  a few weeks ago between Dell and EMC.  Of course I say that kiddingly.  This was the biggest merge to take place in technological history.  A major transformation has been taking place to bring these two technology power houses together as the newly formed Dell EMC.  I, for one, could not be more excited to be a part of making history as an employee of this amazing new company.

oow-small-invite

So why am I telling you all this? I want to invite you to also be a part of history in the making by getting a first-hand -view of the transformation.  How you ask? Join us for an exclusive Dell EMC event this week in San Francisco.  A three day event starting today is being hosted at 839 Howard Street right across from Moscone Center West.  My suspicion is many of you reading this are at Oracle Open World…so why not stop by?  Here are a few reasons why you should:

  • You’ve heard a lot about Dell EMC – Find out directly from the experts what that means to you
  • Dell EMC Oracle Solutions experts will be onsite conducting 1×1 demos and answering all of your questions
  • Technical experts will be running engaging sessions that will showcase Dell EMC solutions for Oracle Applications
  • Breakfast and lunch will be served AND it will be amazing! If you joined us last year you know this is no average conference food
  • Dell EMC knows how to throw a party! This Tuesday night will be one you won’t want to miss

(more…)

Harnessing Simplicity in Midrange Storage Ain’t Easy

Joe Catalanotti

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC, Midrange Storage
Joe Catalanotti is a Product Marketing Manager with Dell EMC Midrange Storage focused on Unity all-flash storage products and solutions. Joe has over 25 years of product and channel marketing experience in storage hardware/software, asset management, and CAD/CAM technology. Joe has been instrumental in the development and execution of go-to-market plans, product launches, and other facets of product marketing. Joe holds a BS degree in Industrial Engineering and Management (Sigma Epsilon Rho) from Northeastern University as well as a degree in Architecture from Wentworth Institute of Technology.

lightswitchChewing gum is simple. So is turning on a light. And it’s simple enough to forget where you parked. OK, maybe so, but when it comes to the sphere of technology “simple” and “simple to use” are frequently advertised terms but rarely live up to the claims. Trying to represent simplicity in technology is actually complex. There are no shortcuts to producing simplicity – especially when it comes to product design as it’s a difficult principle to do well. Edward Tufte said, “Clutter and confusion are failures of design, not attributes of information.” Many products probably start out with simplicity as a real objective but not everyone succeeds. Why? Because simplifying complexity is a commitment to avoid gimmicks, work-arounds, and confusion in the design. It’s about being able to build and express simplicity with substance. Simply put, simple is very hard to do.

There’s nothing easy about what midrange storage arrays do for small-to-medium enterprises and their applications.  There is, however, a solution with Dell EMC Unity Storage. The difference with Unity is that it seamlessly translates the complexities of storage setup, management, and support into an integrated, powerful, and balanced unified platform with superior simplicity and ease of use. Unity has introduced a new level of simplicity and affordability into a family of all-flash arrays targeted to the fastest growing segment of the storage market – small and mid-sized organizations. It was Leonardo da Vinci who said, “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” The sophistication of Unity’s simplicity takes away obstacles long confronted by IT generalists shortening their path to improving processes and practices, delivering IT service management, and pursuing innovation. The design principle of “Keep it Simple Stupid” (KISS) is harder to accomplish than it sounds. Well maybe for others anyway.

You can learn all about the simplicity of Unity in the full blog here.

Expanding the Horizon for Dell EMC Midrange Storage Customers

Guy Churchward

President, Core Technologies Division
Guy Churchward is President of Core Technologies at EMC Corporation. He is responsible for a division that is redefining storage, through a comprehensive portfolio of core storage solutions encompassing the award-winning VMAX, VNX, VNXe, XtremIO, VPLEX, and Data Domain technologies and a cutting-edge software portfolio that delivers simplified storage systems management, continuous availability, replication, backup, and archive solutions. Churchward has more than 27 years of experience in the IT industry, with broad international experience that spans executive management, engineering, sales, marketing and business development capacities. He joined EMC in May 2012, when he served as Senior Vice President of Engineering for the Backup & Recovery Systems Division, before becoming Division President in October 2012. He was appointed to lead the Core Technologies Division in October 2014. Prior to joining EMC, Churchward was President and CEO of LogLogic, an enterprise log and security intelligence platform company. He has also served as Vice President and General Manager of the Data Protection Group at NetApp, where he was responsible for product strategy and development of the company's portfolio of disk-to-disk and disaster recovery products, as well as Vice President and General Manager of BEA's WebLogic Products Group. In addition, he has held senior management positions at Sun Microsystems (formerly Tarantella Inc.), The Santa Cruz Operation (formerly IXI), Accenture (formerly Binder Hamlyn) and Olivetti. Churchward holds an Executive MBA from Stanford Business School and studied computer science at Cambridge Tutors College, England.

Here we are as Dell EMC, and we’re champing at the bit to show our customers, partners and the world what we’re made of as a combined business. We were already recognized as the leader in data storage pre-merger and together we’re going from strong to stronger, now number one across all combined mid-range markets in which we play. If you’re a customer or partner of either company this bodes well for you, as Dell EMC can now offer an even greater choice of world-class products from a single vendor, which has become the largest privately controlled IT company in the world.

Since we started this journey nearly a year ago, we’ve had a number of questions from customers about our plans to support the midrange storage portfolios that are coming together. Let me confirm that we are 100% committed to supporting both EMC Unity and the Dell SC Series (Compellent) going forward. Why? Let’s start with a look at what both product lines have brought to the combined business and then fast forward to see what the future holds.

The Dell EMC midrange businesses represent:

  • Market share of 29.4%, nearly double that of our nearest competitor.
  • Leadership across all price bands. [i]
  • $5 billion in combined revenues [ii] within a total addressable market of more than $17 billion.
  • More than 100,000 existing, passionate storage customers [iii], with the heritage of both EMC technologies well positioned in large enterprises and of Dell’s incredible strength in the entry-level and mid-markets.

entry and midrange

dell emc midrange 2

The Combined Dell EMC Midrange Portfolio – Go Forward from Today
Dell EMC’s midrange portfolio now has a scale and breadth that is without comparison in our industry. Our combined midrange offerings are the strongest they’ve ever been as, this year, we have launched new products such as Unity Flash storage systems and made powerful enhancements to the SC Series OS. This all adds up to a combined portfolio for our customers and partners that is unmatched elsewhere in the industry. (more…)

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