Posts Tagged ‘EMC Unity Storage’

Harnessing Simplicity in Midrange Storage Ain’t Easy

Joe Catalanotti

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC, Midrange Storage
Joe Catalanotti is a Product Marketing Manager with Dell EMC Midrange Storage focused on Unity all-flash storage products and solutions. Joe has over 25 years of product and channel marketing experience in storage hardware/software, asset management, and CAD/CAM technology. Joe has been instrumental in the development and execution of go-to-market plans, product launches, and other facets of product marketing. Joe holds a BS degree in Industrial Engineering and Management (Sigma Epsilon Rho) from Northeastern University as well as a degree in Architecture from Wentworth Institute of Technology.

lightswitchChewing gum is simple. So is turning on a light. And it’s simple enough to forget where you parked. OK, maybe so, but when it comes to the sphere of technology “simple” and “simple to use” are frequently advertised terms but rarely live up to the claims. Trying to represent simplicity in technology is actually complex. There are no shortcuts to producing simplicity – especially when it comes to product design as it’s a difficult principle to do well. Edward Tufte said, “Clutter and confusion are failures of design, not attributes of information.” Many products probably start out with simplicity as a real objective but not everyone succeeds. Why? Because simplifying complexity is a commitment to avoid gimmicks, work-arounds, and confusion in the design. It’s about being able to build and express simplicity with substance. Simply put, simple is very hard to do.

There’s nothing easy about what midrange storage arrays do for small-to-medium enterprises and their applications.  There is, however, a solution with Dell EMC Unity Storage. The difference with Unity is that it seamlessly translates the complexities of storage setup, management, and support into an integrated, powerful, and balanced unified platform with superior simplicity and ease of use. Unity has introduced a new level of simplicity and affordability into a family of all-flash arrays targeted to the fastest growing segment of the storage market – small and mid-sized organizations. It was Leonardo da Vinci who said, “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” The sophistication of Unity’s simplicity takes away obstacles long confronted by IT generalists shortening their path to improving processes and practices, delivering IT service management, and pursuing innovation. The design principle of “Keep it Simple Stupid” (KISS) is harder to accomplish than it sounds. Well maybe for others anyway.

You can learn all about the simplicity of Unity in the full blog here.

Now that Data Centers are Bursting at the Seams is it Time to Modernize?

Guy Churchward

President, Core Technologies Division
Guy Churchward is President of Core Technologies at EMC Corporation. He is responsible for a division that is redefining storage, through a comprehensive portfolio of core storage solutions encompassing the award-winning VMAX, VNX, VNXe, XtremIO, VPLEX, and Data Domain technologies and a cutting-edge software portfolio that delivers simplified storage systems management, continuous availability, replication, backup, and archive solutions. Churchward has more than 27 years of experience in the IT industry, with broad international experience that spans executive management, engineering, sales, marketing and business development capacities. He joined EMC in May 2012, when he served as Senior Vice President of Engineering for the Backup & Recovery Systems Division, before becoming Division President in October 2012. He was appointed to lead the Core Technologies Division in October 2014. Prior to joining EMC, Churchward was President and CEO of LogLogic, an enterprise log and security intelligence platform company. He has also served as Vice President and General Manager of the Data Protection Group at NetApp, where he was responsible for product strategy and development of the company's portfolio of disk-to-disk and disaster recovery products, as well as Vice President and General Manager of BEA's WebLogic Products Group. In addition, he has held senior management positions at Sun Microsystems (formerly Tarantella Inc.), The Santa Cruz Operation (formerly IXI), Accenture (formerly Binder Hamlyn) and Olivetti. Churchward holds an Executive MBA from Stanford Business School and studied computer science at Cambridge Tutors College, England.

When you live in an older house, where the layout doesn’t really work for the way you live your life and there aren’t enough closets to satiate your wife’s shoe fetish, maybe it’s time to modernize! But do you knock the whole house down and start again? Maybe it’s tempting but, what about the investment that you’ve already made in your home? The bathroom you had refitted last year or the wiring you had redone? And where are you going to live during the whole inevitably elongated process?

home-remodel

It’s similar when you want to modernize your IT infrastructure: you have money sunk into your existing technology – probably still amortized for a year or two into the future – and you don’t want to face the disruption of completely starting again. We call this investment hangover ‘tech debt’.

For many companies, this debt includes a strategy for data storage that takes advantage of a shrinking per-gig cost of storage that enables them to keep everything. And that data is probably stored primarily on spinning disk with some high-availability workloads on flash in their primary data center. The old way of doing things was to see volumes of data growing and address that on a point basis with more spinning disk.

But, just like the house we mentioned earlier, data centers are bursting at the seams and it’s now time to modernize – but how?

Read the full blog here to learn how to get started!

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