Posts Tagged ‘IT’

Don’t Be a Dodo

Jay Livens

Director, Product Marketing
Jay’s passion is technology. It started when he was a child and used to take apart flashlights and could not remember how to put them back together. You can imagine how that turned out especially when power outages occurred. However, Jay persisted and charted a course through life that included a lengthy stop in the financial services industry. After receiving an MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management, his path turned towards storage and he had stints with a storage reseller, a storage startup and a couple of big storage companies. After serving in multiple roles, Jay settled on marketing as his future career-path; however, he is not your typical marketer. All things technology intrigue him and he likes to know how things work, not just the marketing stuff, but how stuff really works. At Dell EMC, Jay runs field and channel marketing for the Data Protection and Storage Divisions in the Americas and looks forward to sharing his perspectives on his division, products and life in general.

The Dodo was a flightless bird that lived on the island of Mauritius near Madagascar.  This unique creature was first sighted in 1598 and was known for its relatively large size (3 feet tall, up to about 50 lbs) and inability to fly.  The Dodo lived a life of tranquility without predators and so it never developed traditional defense mechanisms like flight, a sharp beak or even birthing large flocks of offspring.  (It is interesting to note that each Dodo female only laid one egg which further decreased survivability.)  Tragically, the Dodo was unprepared for the arrival of the ultimate predator – humans.

When sailors arrived on Mauritius they were surprised by the Dodo’s blissful ignorance of the new human threat.  Unfortunately, the Dodo’s would live to regret this choice as many ended up on a platter.  Sadly, by the late 1600s, the Dodos were extinct, and today, they are only remembered in written descriptions, drawings and a few lingering skeletons.
dodo-skeleton

The tale of the Dodo is a cautionary one.  Here is a bird that had adapted to its native environment only to find it changing radically.  Some look back and suggest that the Dodo was vapid or otherwise clueless; however the latest research suggests that it was reasonably intelligent and instead was caught in an impossible situation.

The most important lesson that we can learn from the unfortunate demise of the Dodo bird is that we must always look forward.  It is easy and often more comfortable to focus on past accomplishments or implementations, but limiting ourselves to a backward view puts the future at risk.  By looking forward, we become more agile and flexible and better prepared to deal with the rapidly changing world around us. (more…)

Modern Networks for Today and Tomorrow

Doug Fierro

Senior Director, Connectrix and Storage Networking at EMC
Doug Fierro is responsible for the Connectrix Business Unit which drives strategy and product delivery of storage networking technologies at EMC. This includes responsibility for delivering storage networking technologies that EMC sells within the Connectrix and EMC Select product lines, or qualifies within end-to-end solutions. These storage networking technologies include Fibre Channel, Ethernet, iSCSI, FCoE, Network Virtualization and WAN acceleration. Doug has 30 years of technical and marketing experience in the computer and storage industry, which includes 20 years at EMC.

Latest posts by Doug Fierro (see all)

“Why should I buy this now?” Have you ever thought that while looking at the latest products, whether that’s new technology, entertainment systems, sports equipment or anything else?

Do you wonder, “Will it provide more value, better performance, or just a give me something to brag about with my friends?”

Ultimately, you’re trying to decide “Is it worth the investment now, or should I wait?”

That decision process happens all the time when purchasing new products, especially if they are the latest technology. And it is happening again in the Fibre Channel technology race, as the industry is entering the next generation of product cycles, anchored by the latest 32Gb speed, and supported by new capabilities that extend Fibre Channel for the next generation of IT.

When is Enough…Enough???
When your business stops growing, when your customers stop requiring new levels of service, and when your budgets are infinite.X6-8_front Since that is not happening anytime soon, this is a great time to think ahead; position for today and tomorrow; and let new technology provide a way to solve challenges and add value to your business.

EMC, and our close partner Brocade, are giving you that opportunity today. With the latest EMC Connectrix B-Series products, we have worked with Brocade to deliver an industry leading series of 32Gb Fibre Channel systems that are available now, and will help you solve your most critical IT issues today and into the 2020s.

Keeping up with the All Flash Arrays
It is no secret that All Flash storage arrays are changing IT. What has been a bit of a mystery is how your FC storage network can enhance your All Flash array experience. It is amazing how many customers are introducing All Flash arrays into their environment, and connecting them to 5 year old (or older) FC networks. The result is similar to putting a board under the gas pedal of a Formula I car and expecting it to accelerate to top-end speed. It is just not going to happen.

Updating your FC SAN now will help you get the greatest value from your newest All Flash arrays. Doing that with the newest Connectrix B-Series will position you to experience top-end performance now and for many years to come. So you are ready to keep updating your storage environment no matter what new arrays you introduce into your Data Center.

That is future proofing with a purpose… (more…)

Data Protection Everywhere – Why Is It So Important in Today’s Modern Data Center?

Meredith Soper

Marketing Manager, Dell EMC Data Protection Division
As a former college athlete who never lost her competitive edge, I continuously challenge myself to learn new things and become an expert on others. However, my focus is no longer basketball, but the world of data protection. My MBA and innate passion for technology led me to a career in product marketing at Dell EMC, where I aspire to add some pizazz to the already-exciting world of backup and recovery. Outside of the office, I’m a born and raised Bostonian who has trouble pronouncing her R’s (think “pahk the cah”). I love sports, shopping, and a good glass of red wine. Follow me on Twitter @Meredith_Soper and I promise to #followback!

We are entering into a new age. No, it’s not another ice age, so no need to grab your coat and boots. This age brings no snow, but yields an ever-increasing presence of clouds. Let me explain. I am referring to the age of the modern data center. Over the past 15 years, IT has worked in a relatively predictable manner. However, all of this has started to change. Disruptive forces such as cloud computing and the Internet of Things have transformed the way applications are built and utilized.

data protection

The modern data center refers to the future of IT infrastructure. Companies must transform in order to deliver on their customers ever-growing expectations, and data is going to be the competitive differentiator for businesses over the next decade. Something of such importance should be kept safe and protected. This calls for a data protection strategy that acknowledges the current landscape because it is likely that customers will need to continue supporting their current environments, as well as transform for next generation infrastructure initiatives. (more…)

Finding Order out of Chaos in the Multi-hyphenated IT Landscape

Sebastian Yiang

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC Core Technologies, Asia Pacific and Japan
I started out in the IT industry almost 20 years ago as a systems analyst in a large telco within its Internet Service Provider BU to drive product and business development of consumer and enterprise Internet services. I then had the opportunity to do business development and product marketing for connected consumer electronics, web hosting and data center services, and storage solutions before I joined EMC. My current role at Dell EMC is product marketing for Data Protection and Availability Division for Asia Pacific and Japan region. I am based in sunny Singapore and enjoy traveling with my family.

IT storyscapingIT has disrupted many industries and job functions and will continue to do so at a faster pace in today’s hyper-connected world. Even marketers are not spared. In their book Storyscaping: Stop Creating Ads, Start Creating Worlds, Gaston Legorburu and Darren McColl share that storytelling, or story-based differentiation, is no longer the best marketing approach in the digital space. Instead, they advocate “storyscaping,” which is a story system built on engaging customers based on elements of value, story and experience, and focusing on becoming part of  customers’ worlds.

Likewise, IT professionals need to see the forest for the trees; not just living within their multi-hyphenated world but offer value, story and experience to their users. Otherwise, businesses are more likely to view enterprise IT as a cost center and not an area of investment. Unfortunately, enterprise IT often shies away from empowering business users and giving them a more immersive user experience in fear of losing control and visibility. They also fail to articulate and convince their business users how and why IT investments and policies are adding value to the organization. The first sign of chaos is when business users start bypassing IT and go hunting for IT services outside the organization.

How then can enterprise IT find order amidst the chaos that arises from a disengaged organization?

#1:   Transparency is Key
Borrowing from one of Dilbert’s sarcastic one-liners, IT users would assume that IT accomplishments are “suspiciously hard to verify.” Benefits and policies made to new IT investments need to be defined and made relevant to the users. Otherwise, users will not connect with the story and play an active role in it. (more…)

6 Lessons That IT Leaders Can Learn From Darth Vader

Jay Livens

Director, Product Marketing
Jay’s passion is technology. It started when he was a child and used to take apart flashlights and could not remember how to put them back together. You can imagine how that turned out especially when power outages occurred. However, Jay persisted and charted a course through life that included a lengthy stop in the financial services industry. After receiving an MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management, his path turned towards storage and he had stints with a storage reseller, a storage startup and a couple of big storage companies. After serving in multiple roles, Jay settled on marketing as his future career-path; however, he is not your typical marketer. All things technology intrigue him and he likes to know how things work, not just the marketing stuff, but how stuff really works. At Dell EMC, Jay runs field and channel marketing for the Data Protection and Storage Divisions in the Americas and looks forward to sharing his perspectives on his division, products and life in general.

Star Wars: A New Hope was a transformative movie from my childhood, and with the upcoming release of Episode VII later this month, I wanted to share some key lessons that we can learn from Darth Vader.  While he was not the most understanding and supportive leader, there are multiple insights that you can glean from his unique management style.

star-wars-darth-vader-darth-vader-and-apprentice-hiForce choke is not always the answer
Okay, let me start by saying that force choke is an amazingly cool skill.  Imagine using this (for a short duration) to expedite those excessively long meetings!  Meetings aside, ruling your team with an iron fist is a poor strategy because fearful employees are not open to new ideas or innovative thinking.  Instead, these nervous colleagues will default to a “whatever you say is right” mentality which limits creativity and innovation.

Vader provides a good example of how force choking can be detrimental to leadership.  In a scene from A New Hope, Admiral Motti mocked the Force and boasted about the power of the Death Star.  Rather than focusing the discussion on an analysis of the Death Star’s potential weak points and the power of the force, Vader immediately followed the punitive course of action and force choked Motti.  While Darth Vader’s actions illustrated his absolute control, he missed an opportunity to exercise true leadership in discussing the force and the Death Star in more detail.

While there clearly are times when strong actions and words are mandated, this tool, like force choking, needs to be used selectively and a little of it will go a long way.

Compassion can be good
It is easy to feel angry when projects do not go as expected.  The natural reaction for many of us is to let our frustration show and act in ways that illustrate our annoyance.  However it is always helpful to remember that the person (or people) you are working with may be facing similar challenges.  Hence they may also be feeling frustrated and by understanding their viewpoint and showing compassion, you can help everyone be more successful.

Interestingly, Vader is not known as a compassionate leader, but he has demonstrated the skill.  For example at the end of Return of the Jedi, Vader realized that he had a daughter and that deep down inside he really loved his son, Luke.  He demonstrated his compassion by using his last breaths to kill the Emperor and by so doing protecting Luke and his daughter.  It was only at the end of his life that Vader realized the importance of compassion and as IT leaders, we have an opportunity to embrace this tenet earlier in our careers. (more…)

SUBSCRIBE BELOW

Categories

Archives

Connect with us on Twitter

Click here for the Cloud Chats blog