Posts Tagged ‘modern data center’

Purpose-Built Data Protection for Today and Tomorrow

Meredith Soper

Marketing Manager, Dell EMC Data Protection Division
As a former college athlete who never lost her competitive edge, I continuously challenge myself to learn new things and become an expert on others. However, my focus is no longer basketball, but the world of data protection. My MBA and innate passion for technology led me to a career in product marketing at Dell EMC, where I aspire to add some pizazz to the already-exciting world of backup and recovery. Outside of the office, I’m a born and raised Bostonian who has trouble pronouncing her R’s (think “pahk the cah”). I love sports, shopping, and a good glass of red wine. Follow me on Twitter @Meredith_Soper and I promise to #followback!

Buying a car can be challenging. As a buyer, there are certain things you look for and see value in. And those things differ buying personas 1according to your needs. For instance, my ideal car is an SUV with four wheel drive, has a voice-activated GPS system, and is backed by a trusted car brand. From this list of must-haves you can infer my needs; I need a vehicle that is built to withstand New England winters, provides navigation assistance, and is historically known to be reliable. I look for certain features based on my transportation needs. It’s important to note that your list of car requirements is likely different from mine. You may live in a warmer climate where it rarely snows, and therefore prefer an eco-friendly, compact car. Or you may be a NASCAR driver and require a vehicle with a manual transmission and a five-point harness, rather than a traditional seatbelt. I can confidently say your ideal vehicle looks slightly, if not completely, different from mine. Our individual buyer personas are based on each of our distinctive needs.

The same goes for many other aspects of life, as well as business, including the way in which we buy and consume data protection solutions. Each data owner has a distinct set of requirements they need to meet in order to successfully do their job. For instance, the backup admin, database admin and vAdmin each play an important role in the business’ overall data protection strategy. Each individual may be partially, or even solely, responsible for protecting their data and therefore have specific requirements for visibility and control for that protection. And for efficiency and familiarity purposes, each data owner is best empowered through using their native tools and interfaces. The 2016 EMC Global Data Protection Index (GDPI) confirms these points, indicating that management of data protection aligns with environment, meaning that the storage team focuses on storage based protection, the virtualization team on virtual environments, and so forth. And 40% of those surveyed also noted that they prefer a collaborative model, giving both IT and app owners self-service in terms of visibility and management capabilities. Although each individual is working towards the common goal of fully protected and accessible data, the way in which they manage the data protection environment is different. Each situation is unique and every role has unique needs.

In addition, as enterprises engage in implementing more modern approaches to data protection, new requirements will emerge which introduce new buyers. For instance, while self-service in the data center has brought to bear many benefits, it has also contributed largely to copy data sprawl.  The proliferation of copy data leads to increased cost and risk, detracting from an enterprise’s ability to invest in next generation apps and infrastructure. The buyer concerned with controlling copy data is probably the person held accountable for setting SLAs for both protection and storage. They may be an infrastructure or compliance manager and their requirements differ from those of an application, backup, or storage admin, because they have a unique set of needs.
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Tales from EMC World 2016: Building a Modern Data Center

Last year we built a data center as part of our efforts to display our full portfolio of products at EMC World. We would have never imagined the level of interaction and interest we received with hundreds of customers coming through the exhibit every day. Our customers, partners, and internal EMC folks love technology and there is no better way to get a ‘feel’ for it than actually touching it.

This year we decided to do the same thing showcasing some of the most exciting technology advances in years. We organized our live modern data center by 5 key pillars:

Building a modern data center 2

Flash – everyone understands the benefits of Flash from a performance perspective, mainly delivering predictable low response times. But supply-side innovation is allowing us to embed much denser 3D-NAND technologies delivering unprecedented density and lowering CAPEX and OPEX in ways not possible before. All Flash arrays make more sense than ever and we showcased the coolest kids on the block:

  • Unity All Flash systems combining the benefits of flash with unprecedented efficiency and simplicity. Unity is built with end-to-end simplicity in mind bringing innovation like an HTML5-based GUI and a REST API to simplify operations. We also previewed CloudIQ, a cloud-based analytics dashboard to address and manage larger topologies much more proactively.
  • VMAX All Flash combining the benefits of flash with uncontended data services and availability features like SRDF. Through the integration with CloudArray customers can be strategic about their hybrid cloud strategy. Flash where you need it and cloud where you don’t.
  • XtremIO is the uncontended all flash array market leader delivering integrated copy data management capabilities allowing customers to leverage flash in ways they could never before. Being able to deliver copies on demand means better business agility. Being able to do so without tradeoffs around performance and efficiency is the hallmark of the XtremIO architecture and something competitors struggle to match.
  • One interesting addition to our data center this year was DSSD which helps our customers get business outcomes faster than ever before by essentially stripping code out of the IO path while preserving the benefits of shared storage. Server-side flash has often been used but leads to stranded storage and the need to shuffle data around, limited capacity, and no enterprise features to secure the data set. Compare that to DSSD D5, which can provide 144TB capacity, deliver 10MM IOPS at microseconds response times, all in 5U.

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C-D-M and Y-O-U: Excess Copy Data is a Problem, but How Do You Solve It?

Tyler Stone

Dell EMC eCDM Product Marketing
Tyler is currently a software engineer in the Engineering Leadership Development Program at Dell EMC. He has spent the past three years at EMC across multiple roles in storage, IT, and data protection. Tyler has a love of technology and innovation, and something about data centers has always sparked his sense of wonder and amazement (as he says, maybe it’s the flashing lights). When his head isn’t up in the cloud, he is out travelling, taking pictures, or playing golf. Follow him on Twitter @tyler_stone_

If you’ve been following EMC’s latest announcements, one of the numbers you’ve seen repeated over and over… and over is $50 billion, the amount that the “copy data problem” is expected to cost customers globally over the next three years. Given such an outrageous number, it’s hard not to take a closer look at what’s causing this major cost overrun. I’ll save you the Google search and tell you right now: your numerous data copies are taking up valuable space on your storage, and the decentralized self-service methods of monitoring, managing, and protecting these copies are costing you a lot of time and money due to lack of oversight.
CDM and You 1

You can’t expect your DBAs and application owners to deviate from native copy creation processes, and you can’t get rid of every copy in your data center. Copies are vital to supporting nearly every task that shouldn’t be done with production data – operations, analytics, dev/test, data protection, and more. But how effective are you at managing those copies? Can you effectively mitigate the risk associated with self-service copy creation? Do you have the right number of copies on the right storage? Copy management solutions provide a central way to supervise copy creation and administration, which means you get to reclaim control of your copy data. With the right copy management solution, application owners and DBAs can continue to create copies while providing you with a way to oversee copy orchestration and ensure that copies are on the right storage to meet SLAs and mitigate risk.

Okay, so you get it – copy data management is relevant and important to enable self-service, ensure business compliance, and mitigate security and data protection risks. Now here’s the important question: which copy data management solution is best for you? (more…)

Modernizing the Data Center – What is Everyone Else Doing?

Stephen Manley

CTO, EMC Core Technologies Division
Over the past 15 years at both EMC and NetApp, I have traveled the world, helping solve backup and recovery challenges - one customer at a time (clearly, I need to optimize my travel arrangements!). My professional mission is to transform data protection so that it accelerates customers’ businesses. I have a passion for helping engineers pursue technical career path(without becoming managers), telling stories about life on the road and NDMP (yes, that’s NDMP).

“What is everybody else doing?” It’s the question that I’m asked most often. Sometimes, those asking are wondering how their peers are approaching things. Others want to know if different industries have alternate perspectives. Sometimes, they just want to understand what their boss is worried about. Regardless of the reason, it’s useful to understand what smart IT leaders are doing – not to blindly copy them, but to have all the information and options available to them.

At EMC World 2016, we brought together four IT leaders to talk about incorporating cloud, leveraging data analytics, and how to innovate using the talent they already have.

This year’s panelists:

  • Jason Kalich – VP, Cloud & Site Reliability Engineering, GoDaddy
  • Dietmar Reinelt – VP, Cloud Infrastructure Services, SAP
  • Eric Coss – Manager, Infrastructure and Operations, Nationwide
  • Amr Awadallah – CTO, Co-Founder, Cloudera

The panel can be viewed online or below, but if you like the previews as much as the movie, or if you prefer the CliffsNotes to the novel (by the way, why did they change their name from Cliff’s Notes to CliffsNotes?), read on.

Public Cloud – What to Do
Due to the varied industries and roles, each panelist had a different perspective on adopting public cloud. Unlike years past, however, each viewpoint was well-defined and not reactive.

cloud panelThe panel spanned the continuum of public cloud adoption. Jason Kalich, from GoDaddy, believes that everybody will live in a hybrid cloud; even acompany that doesn’t organically embrace the public cloud will acquire somebody who has. Conversely, Eric Coss, of Nationwide, who works in the risk-aware insurance industry, is concerned about security and data services in the public cloud. As a result, he’s focused on private cloud. Eric is not alone in his approach. Amr Awadallah pointed out that, even for a cutting-edge analytics company with “Cloud” in the name, only 15% of Cloudera’s customers run in the cloud. He supports Jason’s view on the market direction, however; he projects that by the end of 2016, 30% of Cloudera’s customers will run in the cloud. Finally, Dr. Reinelt shared that SAP is enabling their customers to make that transition when they’re comfortable. Some customers jump right into public cloud, but others want to take smaller steps. For private cloud, SAP is enabling customers to leverage commodity hardware. Everybody’s cloud journey will be different, and companies like Cloudera and SAP are tailoring their solutions to fit their customers’ path to the cloud.

The public cloud is a viable option for customers and vendors. There will be no “one-size-fits-all” answer to the cloud. There are good reasons to adopt and equally strong reasons to be cautious. Regardless of where you stand, it’s important to have a well-defined position that you are willing to review as the environment and business needs evolve. (more…)

Data Protection Everywhere – Why Is It So Important in Today’s Modern Data Center?

Meredith Soper

Marketing Manager, Dell EMC Data Protection Division
As a former college athlete who never lost her competitive edge, I continuously challenge myself to learn new things and become an expert on others. However, my focus is no longer basketball, but the world of data protection. My MBA and innate passion for technology led me to a career in product marketing at Dell EMC, where I aspire to add some pizazz to the already-exciting world of backup and recovery. Outside of the office, I’m a born and raised Bostonian who has trouble pronouncing her R’s (think “pahk the cah”). I love sports, shopping, and a good glass of red wine. Follow me on Twitter @Meredith_Soper and I promise to #followback!

We are entering into a new age. No, it’s not another ice age, so no need to grab your coat and boots. This age brings no snow, but yields an ever-increasing presence of clouds. Let me explain. I am referring to the age of the modern data center. Over the past 15 years, IT has worked in a relatively predictable manner. However, all of this has started to change. Disruptive forces such as cloud computing and the Internet of Things have transformed the way applications are built and utilized.

data protection

The modern data center refers to the future of IT infrastructure. Companies must transform in order to deliver on their customers ever-growing expectations, and data is going to be the competitive differentiator for businesses over the next decade. Something of such importance should be kept safe and protected. This calls for a data protection strategy that acknowledges the current landscape because it is likely that customers will need to continue supporting their current environments, as well as transform for next generation infrastructure initiatives. (more…)

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