Posts Tagged ‘office 365’

Road to Efficiency, Part 2

Vladimir Mandic

Chief Technology Officer & Distinguished Engineer Data Protection Cloud, Core Technologies Division, Dell EMC
Vladimir has been driving technical innovation and change within EMC for the past 10 years, first in the area of data protection software and, currently, in cloud technologies. Prior to that, he’s had rich industry experience as a solution integrator and in the service provider space. When not working on technology innovation, he may be difficult to locate due to his passion for world travel.

Latest posts by Vladimir Mandic (see all)

As business look at cloud adoption, the question is, “What is the cloud good for?” Yes, the cloud can be efficient and elastic, but what would be its real use in complex environments?

A different way of looking at the road to the cloud is by considering where your data—both primary and secondary copies—resides.
efficiency2-1Cloud as 3rd copy
In a typical data center your primary file and application data would reside in on-premises storage arrays such as XtremIO, VMAX, VNX or Isilon. Second-level protection is offered via data protection solutions using secondary storage such as EMC Data Domain. As a last step, select data can be tiered to the cloud via products such as CloudBoost or CloudArray, to either private clouds built using ECS or public clouds. That means that data in the cloud is a 3rd tier of data. This is a good way to achieve efficiencies for specific use cases such as long-term retention, offsite copy of data, and data archiving while maintaining all primary processing within the data center.

Cloud as 2nd copy
A more direct way of using the cloud is by having data copied directly from primary storage to the cloud (that is, storage tiering) or protecting data directly to the cloud. This results in even higher efficiencies; however, this creates a much larger dependency on the cloud for operational recovery purposes as there is no second copy of data on premises.

Ideally, at this point we would look at direct-to-cloud tiering and protection with ability to maintain on-premises copies of active data for quick access.

Cloud as 1st copy
The last step in cloud adoption is where your primary data resides directly in the cloud, either with SaaS applications (such as Office 365, Salesforce, and Google Apps) or hosted applications running on cloud-based PaaS (such as developed using Pivotal’s Cloud Foundry platform) or IaaS (such as Amazon AWS or Microsoft Azure). In that case, the need for data protection still remains even if infrastructure resiliency responsibility has moved to the cloud solution provider. And to achieve efficiencies, data protection solution and resulting data copies also reside in the cloud itself. However, in that case you may need to export data back to on-premises either for safety, compliancy, or other reasons. (more…)

The Misconceptions and Realities of Data Protection in Cloud-based Office Productivity Suites Today

Mat Hamlin

Director of Products for Spanning by Dell EMC
Mat is the Director of Products for Spanning by Dell EMC. He is responsible for the overall direction and strategy for Spanning's suite of SaaS backup and recovery solutions. His career in technology spans five startups and two large organizations, all in Austin, TX. Mat started out in product support and training, then engineering leadership and for the past nine years has been focused on product management and product marketing. Prior to joining Spanning, Mat served as Sr. Product Manager for SailPoint Technologies and Sun Microsystems, contributing to their market-leading enterprise identity management solutions.

Speaking with customers and prospects is the Spanning product team’s number one priority, and we continue to hear some common themes related to SaaS data protection. It’s always nice to see our findings confirmed by others, — especially industry analysts, In a recent international Gartner study, they found that businesses now consider SaaS deployments mission-critical for cost savings, innovation, and agility. Cloud-based productivity suites like Google Apps and Office 365 are becoming prevalent in the enterprise market, however, as Gartner’s research shows, data loss, privacy and security continue to be primary concerns.

When organizations move to cloud-based applications, they often misunderstand and underestimate the need to consider third-party data protection for SaaS applications like Google Apps and Office 365. So, I’d like to examine some of the misconceptions and explain the realities of data protection in these cloud-based office productivity suites.

Misconceptions about SaaS data protection
It is common for SaaS adopters to think that once they implement a cloud-based productivity solution like Google Apps or Office 365 there’s no further need to think about backup and recovery. Yet approximately 32% of SaaS users have lost data in the cloud.

cloud question markHow is this possible? Many SaaS users don’t fully understand what their cloud service provider covers and where their own responsibility begins in protecting data stored in SaaS applications. Each service provider’s SLA contains detailed and often confusing information on the configuration and policies surrounding each service. Navigating the options is difficult and even with full understanding, there are clear gaps in the providers’ ability to protect and restore customer data.

For example, in Office Exchange Online, users can purge their deleted items folder and their “junk folder” (recoverable items folder). By default, the data is permanently deleted from the recoverable items folder after 14 days (or 30 days if the administrator extends this period manually). Without the right policies in place and a third-party backup and recovery partner, users may be left with no recourse to get this data back from Microsoft. You can learn about other similar scenarios in Office Exchange Online and how to prevent data loss here. (more…)

Why Superman Would Secure His Data in the EMC Data Protection Cloud

Brian Heckert

Principal Content Editor, Dell EMC
My first long-term exposure to technology was the typewriter. I still love that invention, which really sparked my interest in writing. For the past 20 years, I have worked in high tech as a content development specialist, marketing writer, and documentation editor. Prior to working in the software industry, I was a journalist, photographer, photo editor, and military fire fighter. After hours, I enjoy spending time with family, reading, and hiking in the mountains.

“Men weren’t meant to ride with clouds between their knees.” So sang Five for Fighting in the song “Superman (It’s Not Easy).” But Superman is no ordinary man. He does fly with clouds between his knees!

superman

That got me thinking about what Superman would do if he had to protect his data. (And why wouldn’t he? Every business, organization, and person—including superheroes—should be backing up their data to protect it from the Lex Luthors of the world.) The EMC data protection cloud is the most logical place for the Man of Steel’s data. Anything less would be, well, weak. And it wouldn’t meet a superhero’s strict, superhuman standards. But the EMC data protection cloud does. A superhero is all about strength, confidence, being bulletproof, and always making the right choice to protect what’s important. Besides, after logging lots of airtime, Superman is familiar with the cloud. The cloud is logical; it makes good sense.

Let’s take a moment to consider what you need to look for in a protection cloud in order for it to be more powerful than a locomotive.

  • Does your cloud support long-term retention for your data? For superior strength, your protection cloud should enable seamless tiering across all aspects of your organization. And that demands simplified connectivity, integration, and management.
  • Can you send data directly to cloud? You need the option of backing up your primary or secondary data directly to the cloud. That means comprehensive backup for all consumption models, whether in physical or virtual environments. And data must always be securely encrypted during storage and while at rest.
  • What about your SaaS data? Even data from cloud-based workloads needs to be protected. Don’t forget the business-critical data being generated by your SaaS apps including Salesforce, Office 365 and Google Apps; if you’re not protecting it, no one else is.

(more…)

3 Key Data Protection Considerations When Moving to the Cloud

Mat Hamlin

Director of Products for Spanning by Dell EMC
Mat is the Director of Products for Spanning by Dell EMC. He is responsible for the overall direction and strategy for Spanning's suite of SaaS backup and recovery solutions. His career in technology spans five startups and two large organizations, all in Austin, TX. Mat started out in product support and training, then engineering leadership and for the past nine years has been focused on product management and product marketing. Prior to joining Spanning, Mat served as Sr. Product Manager for SailPoint Technologies and Sun Microsystems, contributing to their market-leading enterprise identity management solutions.

ThinkstockPhotos-535375621Get your pencils out. I have a pop quiz! First question: What three IT practices did you use to protect and control your on-premises data from your own employees, contractors, and partners?

If you said, identity and access management, data loss prevention and backup, and recovery you are correct! Using a combination of these three you can manage who has access to data, monitor and control what users are doing with the data, and recover from any mistakes, malicious behavior, misconfigurations or integration problems.

Question 2: How do your responsibilities for these change when you move to a SaaS application like Salesforce, Office 365, or Google Apps?

No, this is not a trick question. If you answered “They don’t change” you are absolutely correct! They don’t.

When you move from an on-premises application to a cloud-based application you are moving to a shared responsibility model where you are no longer responsible for application availability, intrusion detection, software reliability, disaster recovery, etc. The SaaS provider takes care of that but you are still responsible for protecting your data from your own people. (more…)

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