Posts Tagged ‘storage’

‘Tis The Season – And Backup Admins Have Made Their Holiday Wish List!

Alyanna Ilyadis

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC
Alyanna is a Product Marketing Manager at Dell EMC working in data protection. She graduated from Bryant University in 2015 and has been working at Dell EMC since then. Outside of work, she enjoys illustrating and putting too much time into video games.

As the holiday season rolls around, there are plenty of things people are wishing for like new gadgets, updated wardrobe, or even a cozy pet bed for your best friend. And while those things are all well and good, not everyone is hoping for just stocking stuffers this year. The IT industry is now having to deal with an explosion of new data that needs to be protected, and a lack of visibility and control of that data. Faster backup and better protection options are becoming a must. So when a backup admin is asked to make their own holiday wish list, you can bet a new fridge for the office wasn’t at the top.  So what is on the backup admin wishlist?|

“I want to always meet my backup windows”:
When you ask an application or backup owner if they need faster backup and recovery to meet their stringent SLAs – they’re going to tell you yes. Meeting backup windows is becoming harder than ever, and the amount of data that needs to be moved from one place to another is increasing, so speeding that process up is key. When you start talking about mission critical applications, backup and app admins are putting a nice big star next to the first item on their wish list.

Though Santa might not be able to pop down the chimney with this, fortunately for application owners and backup admins, Dell EMC can. Faster backup can sometimes seem out of reach, but by removing the application and backup server from the process, admins can get up to 20x faster backup to better meet their backup windows. Need faster recovery too? Not a problem. With differential restore, which means only recovering the difference between the production and protection lun, app admins can see up to 10x faster recovery . If your application being paused for the length of the backup is also a problem, the removal of the application server from the backup process can reduce or completely eliminate any impact. (more…)

A Dell EMC World 2016 Review

Lauren Simpson

Principal Product Marketing Manager
Lauren is a Principal Product Marketing Manager at EMC working on the Experiential Marketing team. She helps drive customer-facing activities including engagement campaigns, events, webinar programs, and tradeshows. Outside of work, she enjoys traveling and spending time with her husband and two children.

Latest posts by Lauren Simpson (see all)

Although it feels like months ago, Dell EMC World wrapped up on October 20th. The results from all of our activities have trickled in and we now have a holistic view of our Core Technologies performance at the event…and it was stellar!

dew1

The week kicked off with the Executive Summit where two of our products were showcased in the Whisper Suite…shhh! It was an exclusive area where anyone with an approved pass and covered under NDA could enter. The conversations with press, analysts, and customers were driven by our senior product specialists, who ran through product demos and GUI simulators galore.

As the main event came into full swing on Tuesday, the expo hall welcomed over 6,000 attendees to live music, customer experience showcases, a product petting zoo, and countless theater presentations. The hall was packed with folks eager to learn about the new Dell EMC solution offerings. Conversations with our product experts were lengthy, and attendees were hungry for more details about the Core Technologies products. Our hardware was proudly on display, catching the attention of folks walking through the aisles and sparking conversation with our experts.

Attendees, press, and analysts buzzed throughout the convention center to partake in the various activities laid out for them.  There were overwhelmingly positive reviews with the amount of sessions, hands on labs, and booths to visit over the three-day event. The Core Technologies schedule was packed with a “a “Tech Sneak Peek” showcasing the latest release for XtremIO; an interview with TheCUBE and Chris Ratcliffe, and of course the awesome “Dark IT Knight” keynote, where the Data Protection Suite team saved the day. (more…)

Don’t Be a Dodo

Jay Livens

Director, Product Marketing
Jay’s passion is technology. It started when he was a child and used to take apart flashlights and could not remember how to put them back together. You can imagine how that turned out especially when power outages occurred. However, Jay persisted and charted a course through life that included a lengthy stop in the financial services industry. After receiving an MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management, his path turned towards storage and he had stints with a storage reseller, a storage startup and a couple of big storage companies. After serving in multiple roles, Jay settled on marketing as his future career-path; however, he is not your typical marketer. All things technology intrigue him and he likes to know how things work, not just the marketing stuff, but how stuff really works. At Dell EMC, Jay runs field and channel marketing for the Data Protection and Storage Divisions in the Americas and looks forward to sharing his perspectives on his division, products and life in general.

The Dodo was a flightless bird that lived on the island of Mauritius near Madagascar.  This unique creature was first sighted in 1598 and was known for its relatively large size (3 feet tall, up to about 50 lbs) and inability to fly.  The Dodo lived a life of tranquility without predators and so it never developed traditional defense mechanisms like flight, a sharp beak or even birthing large flocks of offspring.  (It is interesting to note that each Dodo female only laid one egg which further decreased survivability.)  Tragically, the Dodo was unprepared for the arrival of the ultimate predator – humans.

When sailors arrived on Mauritius they were surprised by the Dodo’s blissful ignorance of the new human threat.  Unfortunately, the Dodo’s would live to regret this choice as many ended up on a platter.  Sadly, by the late 1600s, the Dodos were extinct, and today, they are only remembered in written descriptions, drawings and a few lingering skeletons.
dodo-skeleton

The tale of the Dodo is a cautionary one.  Here is a bird that had adapted to its native environment only to find it changing radically.  Some look back and suggest that the Dodo was vapid or otherwise clueless; however the latest research suggests that it was reasonably intelligent and instead was caught in an impossible situation.

The most important lesson that we can learn from the unfortunate demise of the Dodo bird is that we must always look forward.  It is easy and often more comfortable to focus on past accomplishments or implementations, but limiting ourselves to a backward view puts the future at risk.  By looking forward, we become more agile and flexible and better prepared to deal with the rapidly changing world around us. (more…)

Happy Birthday to the World Wide Web!

Lori Witzel

Product Marketing Manager, Spanning by EMC
Lori Witzel is a Salesforce MVP, has worked with and for SaaS companies since 2005, and has been sharing info with, listening to, and learning from tech users ever since. She is currently PMM for Spanning Backup for Salesforce, as well as PMM for Spanning Backup for Google Apps. Prior to Spanning Backup, Lori worked for various early-stage Cloud start-ups, mid-sized middleware providers, and ed tech firms, and she’s always eager to learn more. Lori's profile on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/loriwitzel

World map point, line, composition, representing the global.

As Dell EMC continues to innovate in SaaS, hybrid and public cloud technologies, here’s a hat-tip to another innovation that enables us to #GoBigWinBig – the World Wide Web, “born” on November 12, 1990.Some interesting facts about the World Wide Web:

  • The Internet and the World Wide Web are not the same thing. I’m sure some of you know that, but many don’t. Webopedia describes the Internet as “a massive network of networks, a networking infrastructure,” and the World Wide Web as an “information-sharing model that is built on top of the Internet.” In other words, the World Wide Web is a “portion of the Internet.”
  • The World Wide Web has two parents – Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau. They made a proposal to CERN on November 12, 1990 for a hypertext project to solve inefficiencies caused by “incompatibilities of the platforms and tools [that] make it impossible to access existing information through a common interface, leading to waste of time, frustration and obsolete answers to simple data lookup.”
  • Their original proposal provided early support for the concepts of open source and freeware. The proposal stipulated that information was open to additional enrichment by later contributors, and would “provide the software for the above free of charge to anyone.”

With the World Wide Web project, and the subsequent release of the Web browser Mosaic by Marc Andreessen in 1993, SaaS and Cloud as we know them today could be born.

The World Wide Web: Fundamental to the growth of SaaS and Cloud
With Web-enabled, browser-based applications, a global community of users was possible. And that possibility led to potential communities becoming growth markets for a new “computing paradigm where the boundaries of computing will be determined by economic rationale rather than technical limits alone.” The term “cloud computing,” to describe this change in boundary, was first used in 1997 by Ramnath Chellappa at that year’s Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) conference.

And as noted by Ana Cantu (formerly of Dell) in Forbes, “Within just a few years, companies began switching from hardware to cloud services because they were attracted to benefits like a reduction in capital costs as well as an easing in IT staffing issues.” (more…)

Winning the Olympic Gold and Modernizing the Data Center shouldn’t be a Flash in the Pan

Sebastian Yiang

Product Marketing Manager, Dell EMC Core Technologies, Asia Pacific and Japan
I started out in the IT industry almost 20 years ago as a systems analyst in a large telco within its Internet Service Provider BU to drive product and business development of consumer and enterprise Internet services. I then had the opportunity to do business development and product marketing for connected consumer electronics, web hosting and data center services, and storage solutions before I joined EMC. My current role at Dell EMC is product marketing for Data Protection and Availability Division for Asia Pacific and Japan region. I am based in sunny Singapore and enjoy traveling with my family.

all-flash-olympicsIt was August 12th. The 100m butterfly finals at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games glued a nation of 5 million to their television sets as their national swimmer Joseph Schooling competed with the Games’ most medaled and legendary Michael Phelps. Smashing the Olympic, Asian and national records, Schooling became the world’s fastest butterfly specialist and brought home Singapore’s first-ever Olympic Gold medal. Schooling has taught us many valuable lessons. His achievement shows us that we can all achieve our dreams if we set our goals, take actions and stick to the game plan, despite facing challenges and failures along the journey.

What lessons can enterprise IT learn from this success story?

 

 

Review and Update Your Business and IT Goals
At the age of 14, Schooling met his idol Michael Phelps in Singapore back in 2008 when the United States Olympic swim team stopped over for a training camp before the Beijing Olympics. Eight years later, he beat his idol with an Olympic record of 50.39 seconds in the 100m butterfly event. Schooling revealed in a local press interview that Phelps helped to inspire him to achieve Olympic glory. His goal is nothing less than a gold medal. With his Olympic dream in mind, Schooling gave himself a higher goal after achieving major milestones.

Many IT professionals have personal goals in their career. But how many know their organization’s business and IT goals? For enterprise IT to achieve success in positively impacting the organization’s business and growth, there must be a strategic goal and plan that motivates every IT personnel. Otherwise, disengaged and unmotivated staff affects IT productivity and staff morale, and even derails your goals.

Most IT organizations have strategic goals to optimize or modernize their data centers through the deployment of virtualization, cloud, software-defined and open platform technologies. With flash drives becoming more affordable over the last few years, compression technologies and business requirement for always-on mission-critical applications, many IT organizations are now looking to modernize their data centers with all flash storage arrays and relegating traditional disk to bulk and archive storage requirements.

If you have not considered an all-flash storage strategy for your data center, this IDC infobrief on global flash technology adoption dated Feb 2016 may change your mind. It concludes that “flash is unlocking innovation and enabling business transformation”. (more…)

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